NEW WORLD DICTATORSHIP- Your RESPONSE Appreciated

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Question: What will YOU do ?

1. FIGHT !!!
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2. Accept IT !!! (Loser)
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3. Email a Page(Senators/Congress ONLY)
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Total Votes: 10

Displaying #1-4 of 4 total posts
49829 Nibs: 572
Member Since: May 24th 2006
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Posted on Oct 13th 2006  -  Subject: NEW WORLD DICTATORSHIP- Your RESPONSE Appreciated
Frist, Theocracy, And The Attack On Internet Poker Author: Anthony Cabot Email this article to a friend “We can reasonably claim that the playing with these or any other decorated pieces of pasteboard may be properly called a sin in itself.” —William Edward Biederwolf, “The Sin Of Gambling,” originally printed in the Plains Baptist Challenger, April 1978 DURING THE FINAL DAYS OF SEPTEMBER, as everyone who engages in interactive gaming surely already knows, Federal legislation opposing the interests of online poker players (among others) was rammed through Congress by Senate leadership. But gambling is not the target of the efforts in Washington and elsewhere—it is much more the victim of a greater battle. A fundamentalist movement in this country poses a great challenge to historical concepts of personal liberties. The Republican Party today is no longer guided by the principles of Abe Lincoln. After all, the first Republican platform stated with a resolution that “with our Republican fathers, we hold it to be a self-evident truth that all men are endowed with the inalienable right of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” This simple phrase from the Declaration of Independence owed much to the British philosopher John Locke, who stated that “no one ought to harm another in his life, health, liberty, or possessions” to describe the concept of “natural rights.” Locke’s simple notion was that all persons have natural rights, which included the right to pursue happiness. Some people find happiness in playing poker. Few will argue that Lincoln himself espoused limited government with a goal to protect individual natural rights. In stark contrast, the current Republican Party stands far from the notion of natural rights, and instead espouses Biblical theocracy represented by the “Religious Right.” The ideology of the new Republican Party is to limit personal freedoms to create a culture consistent with their vision of a Christian society. The goal noted by one leader of the movement is “to reclaim America for Christ, whatever the cost. As the vice regents of God, we are to exercise godly dominion and influence over … our government, our literature and arts, our sports arenas, our entertainment media … in short, over every aspect and institution of human society.” In 1992, Pat Robertson told the Denver Post that “We want … as soon as possible to see a majority of the Republican Party in the hands of pro-family Christians.” And, they did. Since 1992, the Republican Party, its leadership, and its policies are effectively dictated by the agenda of Robertson, Jerry Falwell, and James Dobson. Even Republican Congressman Christopher Shays of Connecticut lamented that “the Republican Party of Lincoln has become a party of theocracy.” What does all of this have to do with poker? Everything. In the closing days of the 109th Congress, Senate Majority leader Bill Frist attached an anti-Internet gambling bill as a rider to a bill that dealt with port security. Frist pursued the amendment with a religious fervor that one would associate with matters of only the greatest national importance. Frist was initially rebuffed by the conference considering a Department of Defense bill. Senator John Warner from his own party sent him a scathing letter. But Frist put his head down and charged ahead, finding a vehicle in the Port Security Act. He rammed it through in a matter of hours, so rapidly that one member of the conference acknowledged that he did not even read the amendment. Frist’s proposed amendments have nothing to do with port security nor have they been vetted by any Senate committee having oversight over commerce, crime, or banking. Frist’s passion comes from his impending campaign for the Presidency and the knowledge that this issue plays well to a Religious Right that believes that gambling is the devil’s playground. Whether Frist is a true believer or a megalomaniac seeking the ultimate prize is irrelevant. He needed this legislation to gain the blessing from the pulpit. This is win-at-all-cost politics. The Rule of Law has been replaced by the notion that morally wrong actions are necessary to achieve morally right outcomes. To put it simply, Frist won, and the democratic process lost. So the new “Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006” will, by the time you read this, be the law of the land. When the public (and apparently most of the Congress) had a chance to actually read the Act, they found it startling. The bill attacks Internet gambling sites but leaves opened the door to state lotteries, land-based casinos, horse racing, and fantasy sports. The Act has two parts. The first part makes it a crime punishable by up to five years in jail for an Internet site to either accept any type of payment for Internet gambling not permitted or licensed by a state or to even provide information on how to fund an Internet account. The second part requires the government to impose regulations on financial institutions to identify and block financial transactions to these sites. What does this mean to the common poker player? Simply it is a derogation of your liberties. In the days following the passage of the bill, some of the best run and regulated poker sites in the world announced they were closing their rooms to U.S. play. Many are British firms listed on the U.K. markets. You, the consumer, now may have to go to sites with less accountability to regulators to play poker. Caveat Emptor—but deservedly so because, according to the Frist mindset, you are sinners. Will this stop Internet poker? Not a chance. Thankfully, the Internet is the greatest equalizer. It is a bastion of freedom, a virtual world where the confines of small thinking governments cannot hope to control actions or thoughts. Poker sites from parts unknown will continue to flourish and smart entrepreneurs will quickly find the holes in the government regulations to service the funds-transfer needs of a population that enjoys playing poker. Then, one day, one of the sites or funds-transfer providers that arose after publicly traded and regulated British companies left the industry will be linked to either organized crime or a terrorist group, and the self-righteous former Senator from Tennessee will proclaim at a commencement speech at Oral Roberts University that “Thank God, we moved to stop the evils of Internet gambling when we did.” And Abraham Lincoln will turn to the spirit in the sky and ask who stole the ideology of the political party that once really believed in the meaning of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.
Sidney H. Moats Jr.
21941 Nibs: 1,019
Member Since: Feb 17th 2006
Quote
Posted on Dec 2nd 2006
Frist, Theocracy, And The Attack On Internet Poker Author: Anthony Cabot Email this article to a friend “We can reasonably claim that the playing with these or any other decorated pieces of pasteboard may be properly called a sin in itself.” —William Edward Biederwolf, “The Sin Of Gambling,” originally printed in the Plains Baptist Challenger, April 1978 DURING THE FINAL DAYS OF SEPTEMBER, as everyone who engages in interactive gaming surely already knows, Federal legislation opposing the interests of online poker players (among others) was rammed through Congress by Senate leadership. But gambling is not the target of the efforts in Washington and elsewhere—it is much more the victim of a greater battle. A fundamentalist movement in this country poses a great challenge to historical concepts of personal liberties. The Republican Party today is no longer guided by the principles of Abe Lincoln. After all, the first Republican platform stated with a resolution that “with our Republican fathers, we hold it to be a self-evident truth that all men are endowed with the inalienable right of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” This simple phrase from the Declaration of Independence owed much to the British philosopher John Locke, who stated that “no one ought to harm another in his life, health, liberty, or possessions” to describe the concept of “natural rights.” Locke’s simple notion was that all persons have natural rights, which included the right to pursue happiness. Some people find happiness in playing poker. Few will argue that Lincoln himself espoused limited government with a goal to protect individual natural rights. In stark contrast, the current Republican Party stands far from the notion of natural rights, and instead espouses Biblical theocracy represented by the “Religious Right.” The ideology of the new Republican Party is to limit personal freedoms to create a culture consistent with their vision of a Christian society. The goal noted by one leader of the movement is “to reclaim America for Christ, whatever the cost. As the vice regents of God, we are to exercise godly dominion and influence over … our government, our literature and arts, our sports arenas, our entertainment media … in short, over every aspect and institution of human society.” In 1992, Pat Robertson told the Denver Post that “We want … as soon as possible to see a majority of the Republican Party in the hands of pro-family Christians.” And, they did. Since 1992, the Republican Party, its leadership, and its policies are effectively dictated by the agenda of Robertson, Jerry Falwell, and James Dobson. Even Republican Congressman Christopher Shays of Connecticut lamented that “the Republican Party of Lincoln has become a party of theocracy.” What does all of this have to do with poker? Everything. In the closing days of the 109th Congress, Senate Majority leader Bill Frist attached an anti-Internet gambling bill as a rider to a bill that dealt with port security. Frist pursued the amendment with a religious fervor that one would associate with matters of only the greatest national importance. Frist was initially rebuffed by the conference considering a Department of Defense bill. Senator John Warner from his own party sent him a scathing letter. But Frist put his head down and charged ahead, finding a vehicle in the Port Security Act. He rammed it through in a matter of hours, so rapidly that one member of the conference acknowledged that he did not even read the amendment. Frist’s proposed amendments have nothing to do with port security nor have they been vetted by any Senate committee having oversight over commerce, crime, or banking. Frist’s passion comes from his impending campaign for the Presidency and the knowledge that this issue plays well to a Religious Right that believes that gambling is the devil’s playground. Whether Frist is a true believer or a megalomaniac seeking the ultimate prize is irrelevant. He needed this legislation to gain the blessing from the pulpit. This is win-at-all-cost politics. The Rule of Law has been replaced by the notion that morally wrong actions are necessary to achieve morally right outcomes. To put it simply, Frist won, and the democratic process lost. So the new “Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006” will, by the time you read this, be the law of the land. When the public (and apparently most of the Congress) had a chance to actually read the Act, they found it startling. The bill attacks Internet gambling sites but leaves opened the door to state lotteries, land-based casinos, horse racing, and fantasy sports. The Act has two parts. The first part makes it a crime punishable by up to five years in jail for an Internet site to either accept any type of payment for Internet gambling not permitted or licensed by a state or to even provide information on how to fund an Internet account. The second part requires the government to impose regulations on financial institutions to identify and block financial transactions to these sites. What does this mean to the common poker player? Simply it is a derogation of your liberties. In the days following the passage of the bill, some of the best run and regulated poker sites in the world announced they were closing their rooms to U.S. play. Many are British firms listed on the U.K. markets. You, the consumer, now may have to go to sites with less accountability to regulators to play poker. Caveat Emptor—but deservedly so because, according to the Frist mindset, you are sinners. Will this stop Internet poker? Not a chance. Thankfully, the Internet is the greatest equalizer. It is a bastion of freedom, a virtual world where the confines of small thinking governments cannot hope to control actions or thoughts. Poker sites from parts unknown will continue to flourish and smart entrepreneurs will quickly find the holes in the government regulations to service the funds-transfer needs of a population that enjoys playing poker. Then, one day, one of the sites or funds-transfer providers that arose after publicly traded and regulated British companies left the industry will be linked to either organized crime or a terrorist group, and the self-righteous former Senator from Tennessee will proclaim at a commencement speech at Oral Roberts University that “Thank God, we moved to stop the evils of Internet gambling when we did.” And Abraham Lincoln will turn to the spirit in the sky and ask who stole the ideology of the political party that once really believed in the meaning of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. I always fight for what I believe in...
***Live life to the fullest*** Nina Helmich
65771 Nibs: 1,021
Member Since: Sep 26th 2006
Quote
Posted on Dec 2nd 2006
i have alway fought for my rights heck i hate all forms of governments they never live by their own rules just break our backs
Darren Jackman
64802 Nibs: 1,476
Member Since: Sep 9th 2006
Quote
Posted on Dec 2nd 2006
we are n a dictatorship right now the way Bush is running the country
those who never try, never succeed
Displaying #1-4 of 4 total posts

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