i have a trouble

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Posted on May 6th 2008  -  Subject: i have a trouble
i loss to many chips by playng with QJ 10J K10 KJ but iff i play only with big cards like AA AQ KK KQ QQ JJ TT probably i will play 2 or maybe 3 hands in one hour , so then i tried to play with this small cards and i get beat by oppents who have 2 pairs like Q3 or K8...what can i do?
91109 Nibs: 3,714
Member Since: Apr 20th 2008
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Posted on May 6th 2008  -  Subject: Ehumm...
i loss to many chips by playng with QJ 10J K10 KJ but iff i play only with big cards like AA AQ KK KQ QQ JJ TT probably i will play 2 or maybe 3 hands in one hour , so then i tried to play with this small cards and i get beat by oppents who have 2 pairs like Q3 or K8...what can i do?I am not the best player not even close to be one. lol I have heard that poker is best when it is booring, I guess you have to go for those 2 or 3 hands per hour. Nah.. just kidding, why not mix up, play some cards under 10 too.. I mean 89, 87,86 suited.. Your opponents should not know if you are playing monsters or crap. I guess you have to get use to those Q3 and K8.. they are always going to be there, because some people are crazy.  They can also nock down your good cards too... sadly.  
2x LB3 winner, 1x LB1 winner, 2nd in Player --> The fish can too, if not win it can lose!
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Member Since: Apr 17th 2008
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Posted on May 6th 2008
i loss to many chips by playng with QJ 10J K10 KJ but iff i play only with big cards like AA AQ KK KQ QQ JJ TT probably i will play 2 or maybe 3 hands in one hour , so then i tried to play with this small cards and i get beat by oppents who have 2 pairs like Q3 or K8...what can i do?hmm yes fritzson is right try to play other cards too... theres cards hitting perfect.. K7 for an example.. T9, Q9 great pushing hands.. 45 suited one of my favourits.. hehe
BULLs, Wass BRL#20 Winners, February, 2008 * 7 x Wass BRL Champions *
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Posted on May 7th 2008
Sometimes whith great hand games come great losses  ... Dont play the cards play the players .
OK OK I FOLD!!!
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Member Since: Dec 19th 2005
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Posted on May 8th 2008
A few options for table image and style of play: A note: position refers to your place at the table relative to the dealer button. On the button means last to act, one off the button or button + 1 means 2nd last to act and so on. UTG refers to under the gun, as in first to act once the blinds have been posted and UTG + 1 means 2nd to act after the blinds and so on. BB means big blind and SB means small blind. 1) Continue to play tight, but utilize your position to play more hands AA,KK,QQ,JJ,1010, AK, AQ suited or offsuit = raise in any position 22,33,44,55,66,77,88,99 call in any position, raise when you're close to the button (button, button + 1) AJ, KQ, KJ, suited connectors (QJ - 109) limp in late position Muck pretty much any other hand, they aren't really worth playing too much. Limp or complete the blind with anything into an unraised pot and feel free to call gapped suited connectors into multiway pots to try and hit big. Basically you are utilizing a tight image to prey on the weaker players. If you don't play enough hands, then open more than one table. With this strategy, you can see yourself playing anywhere between 15-25% of hands, depending on what you're dealt. Given a normal 65 hands per hour 10 person table, thats around 16 per hour, not 2 or 3, lol. Mutlitable with 4 tables and you're playing 60+ hands per hour, instead of jsut a few. Thats how you stay tight.   2) Loosen up your hand requirements, but utilize the power of the raise (usually 3x BB pre flop and 4 x any raise if you are in position) to weed out weaker players. Raise AA = 22 in any position Raise AK, AQ, AJ, A10 and any suited Ax in any position. Raise suited KQ, KJ, K10, QJ, J10 in any position Raise suited connectors up to 4 spots from the button (counter clockwise) Continuation bet on any flop where you have position (hit or miss) and any flop where you hit. Continuously apply pressure to try and make your opponents keep guessing at what you are holding. This type of style works best on 6 player tables or in short handed play.   3) Utilize position to your advantage, take advantage of limping in middle position to try and see some flops Similar to the first style, except that you are raising any of the following in position (button, button +1 and button + 2) AA - 22, AK, AQ, AJ, KQ suited or offsuit, QJ, J10, 109, 98, 87 all suited Raise the following in the SB, BB, UTG, UTG + 1 AA - JJ, AK, AQ suited or offsuit Limp in middle position (positions 5, 6, 7 at a ten person table) 1010 - 22, any suited Ax, KQ, KJ, QJ, J10 suited This style as mentioned is much similar to the first one, however you should be raising more often in late position if you feel you a hand that is worth playing. Your goal is to play tight and play quality hands, but make people put chips in the middle to see flops.   For all styles of play When raising from late position, you should be continuation betting regardless of whether you hit the flop. If  there is flush or straight draw on the board, don't be afraid to bet the turn in order to weed out the chasers, even if you still have nothing. If you raised in early position and only got one caller, lead out on the flop and make your opponent decide whether or not to call. Use judgement though, if you raised with 44 and got one caller and the flop comes AQK, it would be wise to check and see what your opponent does. Take shots at flops that don't contain too many scare cards and don't be afraid to release your hand if you think you're losing. Aggressive play is always the better choice, but don't start wasting chips trying to force people out of hands. The reality of online poker is that many players don't know that they should fold there hand given the way you are betting or what the board is showing. Don't make the mistake of giving more chips than you have to away. Pick your spots and punish players that want to play with junk. Slow play only when the board isn't scary and never be upset at winning the blinds.
It's easier to fish if you're the one casting the reel.
82952 Nibs: 2,802
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Posted on May 15th 2008
Another nice post by dingus , thanks .  
OK OK I FOLD!!!
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Posted on May 15th 2008
Preflop Poker Hands and Position Position is everything in texas hold'em. It is definitely the most important aspect of the game. The importance of position in hold'em cannot be emphasized enough. You must play very tight poker in early position, but you should loosen way up as you get closer to the button. Not only do you open yourself up to a greater potential to get raised when you open early, you will have the same bad position for all betting rounds including the more expensive later rounds, and that is the main reason to consider position when you decide whether or not to play a hand. Your opponent(s) will have to act first in hands you play from better position, and you will get to react to their plays, and it will be easier to read their hands. The value of position cannot be specifically quantified, but there are many advantages to position in texas hold'em, and they are all HUGE. Overall, you will win more and lose less on the hands that you play from better position. The advantages of position allow you to play increasingly weaker starting hands profitably from better position. The most important decision you will make in playing a hand is whether or not to play it at all. The following table lists the minimum required hands to consider playing a pot according to your playing position. "Consider playing a pot" is stated because you would play these cards from the corresponding position if the hand develops appropriately for your particular cards. Texas hold'em is a situational game. There are many factors that go into a decision to enter a pot. It always depends on the specific situation (how the hand develops as well as the game, the stakes, the players, their frame of mind etc.). That being said, the table below lists some general pre-flop requirements to consider entering a pot according to position in a ten-handed limit hold'em ring game. You should never consider playing a hand that is weaker than what is listed for each position, and you should often pass on the middle and late position hands if the pot does not develop correctly for your starting hand. Minimum Hand Requirements for Ten-Handed Limit Texas Hold'em: Early Position (Playable from any position) Pairs AA, KK, QQ, JJ, TT, 99, 88 Suited AKs-A10s, KQs, KJs, QJs Unsuited AK, AQ Middle Position (Playable from middle or late position) Pairs 77, 66, 55 Suited A9s, KTs, QTs, JTs, T9s, 98s Unsuited AJ, AT, KQ, KJ Late Position (only playable from late position, and only if the pot develops accordingly) Pairs 44, 33, 22 Suited A8s-A2s, K9s, K8s, Q9s, J9s, T8s, 87s, 76s, 65s, 54s Unsuited A9, KT, QJ, QT, JT, T9 Blinds (additional hands that may be playable from the blinds if the pot develops accordingly)   Any pair, any suited + AX, KX, Q9, J9, J8, T8, 98, 87, 76, 65, 54 [ You can also visit the poker hands page on this site for more information regarding starting hand selection in texas hold'em. ] Here is some poker theory on the minimum recommended playing hands: Pairs: Pocket pairs are great because of their potential to win unimproved; especially big pocket pairs like AA, KK, and QQ. Medium pocket pairs like JJ-88 can also win unimproved, but not nearly as often. Smaller pocket pairs are usually only profitable if you make three of a kind (set). You will flop a set or better 11.8% of the time (7.5 to 1). If you flop your set, you will fill up (make a full house) or make quads on the turn or river 33.4% of the time as well. Suited: Pocket cards that are suited have a significant advantage over unsuited cards of the same numeric value. In addition to the odds of winning a hand by pairing cards on the board, suited cards will flop a 4 flush 10.9% of the time (you will complete the flush 35.0% of those times). They will flop a flush outright 0.85% of the time. Connectors: Connected cards and to a lesser extent cards with only one gap have an increased value because of their chance to make a straight. The odds of flopping a straight draw of some sort depend on the cards. An AK can only make one straight, where as connectors JT-54 can each make four straights using both cards. AK is still the better hand because of the rank of the cards. If you flop an open ended straight draw, you will complete the hand 31.5% of the time. Big cards: You will pair one of your unmatched cards on the flop 32.4% of the time (about 2 to1 against). Offsuit hands with no little or no straight potential are the worst kinds of hands to get involved with. A9 does appear in the minimum hand requirements for opening in late position because of the numeric value of the cards alone. Starting hole cards that do not match an opponent's hole cards are usually only small favorites versus each other head to head (except pair against pair). Head to head, a pair versus two overcards like 66 against AK is only a slight favorite (55%). High card and low card versus two unmatched cards with values between them like T6 vs. 78 is about a 57% favorite, while unmatched cards versus two smaller cards like AK vs. QT is about a 64% favorite. Preflop to finish, AK is only about a 2 to 1 favorite over 32. You can see from these examples that the advantages of suited and connected cards can contribute significantly to preflop hand selection. Dominating Poker Hands A texas hold'em hand is dominated if it has 3 or fewer outs against a hand it faces, like AQ against AK. In this example only a Q can help AQ, an A will not. A hand like AK is a 3 to 1 favorite over hands it dominates like AQ, AJ, A9, KQ, KT, etc. (again, AK vs. 32 is only a 2 to1 favorite). An even more dominated situation occurs when you have a pair versus a smaller pair like JJ vs. 99 or a pair against two unmatched smaller cards like JJ vs. 98. In both of these cases, the JJ is about a 4 to 1 favorite. The most dominated situation occurs with a pair against another card of that same rank and a lower card, like AA against AQ. In this case there is no single card that can help AQ. A player in this situation can only catch two queens or make a miracle straight to escape (11.5 to 1 against). These are the profitable situations you are looking for and the horribly unprofitable situations you are looking to avoid. Profitable play involves dominating your opponent's hands and avoiding situations where your hand is dominated. This has much to do with the opening hand recommendations because suited cards and connectors have the ability to make straights and flushes that escape the trap of domination. That is why the only offsuit hands you can play from early position are AK and AQ. When a player calls early with AT and gets involved in a pot against AJ or AQ, the A is dead for the AT hand. If the flop comes with an A and no Q or T, this dominated hand only has a 12.5% chance to catch a T on the turn or river and win the pot (7 to 1 against). And, the better hand has just as good of a chance to catch their kicker as well, in which case AT will still lose. This is the position you want to put your opponents in. You should be very selective about the hands you get involved with, especially from early position. You MUST be more selective about the hands you play relative to the hands your opponents play. If you choose to pass on more hands preflop and play better hands in more favorable position than your opponents, you give yourself a statistical advantage that translates into more profitable situations. It's just that simple. You win at limit texas hold'em in hand selection. Watching out for yourself in poker: If you ever find yourself holding a hand you know you should fold from the position you are in, but start thinking, "Well, it only cost me one small bet to see the flop", you are dead wrong. The pot can still be raised behind you, but that is the least of your concern. The worst thing that usually happens is that you hit your hand in some way on the flop, and you get stuck having to call more bets with a hand that has almost no chance to win. You will often discover that your hand was dominated from the beginning. Also, the more hands you throw away before the flop, the more likely that when someone happens to get 4 of a kind or a straight flush, or some other monster hand, you will not be in on the hand to pay them off. A good example of an overplayed hand is Ax offsuit. If you come in with something like A8 and catch an A on the flop, you are likely to end up losing a big pot to something like AJ. Most poor players play too many hands, go too far with them, and don't give position enough consideration. The hand recommendations presented here assume that the game is typical (somewhat loose). You must make some adjustment if you are playing in a very loose or tight poker game. In a very loose game without much preflop raising (loose passive), you can get involved with more hands from early and middle position, but if the game is tight with few players in each pot, and pots often being raised preflop (tight aggressive), you must play even tighter from each position. You might want to find another table in this later case. Tight aggressive play in a loose passive game is most profitable. These starting hand recommendations also assume a full ring game. Making adjustments in your hand selection: As the game gets more short-handed however, you are forced to play more hands and play more aggressively. The value of each starting hand naturally goes up when there are fewer hands against you, and you have to post blinds more often. As the game gets very short handed down to heads up play, it has been shown that a player can have a significant mathematical advantage by simply betting at every opportunity against a player that doesn't use proper short-handed tactics (betting, calling and reraising more than seems proper). You should be aware of this tactic any time a ring game begins to break up and you are left in a short handed game. There is a lot of literature on short-handed theory and tactics, and you should become familiar with it if you wish to play in short-handed games. [MJ: Don't ever think that you can learn short-handed play on the fly on your own, because you can't. The easiest way that poker players lose money is by playing outside of their element. If you want to become good at short-handed games, which can be very profitable, start out low and work your way up.] These minimum hand recommendations actually assume that the pot has developed ideally for each starting hand listed in the table. This theoretical loose passive full ring game where an ideal number of opponents enter the pot ahead of you for each starting hand listed in the table is far from a realistic game. If you are playing in a tighter or very loose game, maybe short a player or two, with a varying number of opponents entering the pot ahead of you each hand, you will of course have to make an adjustment for each new situation. That is what it's all about. You will be placed in a new situation every time it is your turn to act. Profitable texas hold'em comes from critical analysis of any and all information you acquire as you play. You use this valuable information to adapt your general strategy to your specific situation in such a way as to make the best (most profitable) decision about how to proceed. As it turns out, many middle and late position hands are usually playable when there have only been callers to your right. In later position, you will have more information to consider, and you will know if this is a good situation for your hand. The number of players in the pot, which players come in and how they have played past hands gives you much information to consider in deciding whether or not to get involved when you hold some of the weaker middle and late position hands. You will want to pass on many of these hands if the pot doesn't develop how you would prefer for your hand, and you will be more inclined to play against opponents who you have seen make bad plays. If you are in late position and no one has opened, hands like A7 or K8 will often be better than any two random cards held by the few remaining players that have yet to act, so you can consider playing these very marginal hands when you know that most players have already folded. You will usually want to raise in this type of situation to try to steal the blinds (more on this later). However, if any players come in front of you, you would never play hands like A7 or K8. They could easily be dominated and have very little chance to escape. How to play your hands preflop: You must consider your position in how you play your hand in Texas hold'em. You must know what kind of action you want with your hand, and play accordingly from your position. You obviously must play only very good hands from early position, because you have very little control over how the hand will develop. You should often raise and/or reraise from any position with big pocket pairs like AA, KK, and QQ. You are likely to dominate many of the hands that will play against you. You want to get as much money in the pot as possible before the flop when you have one of these absolute best starting hands. If you were first in from early position with one of these huge hands, you might consider limping in with the intention of reraising if you suspect you might get a raise from another player. You would only consider limp-reraising if you are first in and your early position raises were not getting many callers. Once a player comes in, go for the raise and try to isolate them. Playing big hold'em hands: You should raise an opened pot whenever you think you will win more than your share of what goes in. You obviously want to force opponents to put more money into the pot when you are likely to have the best hand, especially when you are likely to dominate their hands. Most players raise with their best hands, so you will almost always fold to a tight player's raise, and avoid this situation where your hand could easily be dominated. If you have a premium hand like AA, KK, QQ, JJ, AKs or AK, you would always reraise rather than just call. You reraise to isolate and hopefully get heads up, and you want as much money in the center as possible with your premium hand. Cold calling a preflop raise is almost always a mistake. If you have some reason to believe the raiser has a less than premium hand, you could also reraise with TT, 99, or AQs, but you should definitely either reraise or fold. Exceptions to this reraise or fold approach to facing preflop raises occur when you are either in the big blind or there are many players in the pot and you have a hand that plays very well multiway. Both of these situations will be addressed later. From early position, you usually want to raise with medium pocket pairs like JJ -99 and big offsuit cards like AK and AQ to cut down the number of opponents and increase your chance of winning the pot. If you raise preflop from early position with something like 99, you reduce the number of players that will see the flop and make it more likely that your hand will be best even if an overcard falls. With no raise, hands like KJ or A10 will be more likely to come in and beat you if an overcard does flop. Also, any time you raise, you maximize your profit when you do win the pot, so it is usually profitable to raise when you have a strong hand. However, in late position following several limpers, you would not want to raise with 99 because you will now fail to cut down the number of players who will see the flop (any player who called the blind will call a second bet if you raise). You would probably be better off to just call and see the flop before you invest more. The majority of your profit from 99 in this case would be when you either flop a set of nines or no overcards fall on the flop. Big offsuit cards like AK play best with a raise. The more players that see the flop, the less money you will win with hands like this (even though more players are putting money into the pot). If you do win, you will win a larger pot, but it is well known (and backed up by statistical analysis) that the more players that see the flop, the less profitable hands like AK become. The hand is not suited so will unlikely make a flush, and even though it is a connector, there is only one straight that can be made using both cards. You profit from hands like AK, AQ and KQ mostly by making top pair (or two pair using a board pair) with the best kicker. If many players see the flop, it is more likely that someone will make a hand like two pair, three of a kind, a straight or a flush. You raise for two reasons: to get more money in the pot when you have a great hand, and more importantly to keep other players out of the pot to increase your chance of winning. It is usually worth a raise from any position with big offsuit cards if you will cut down the field with your raise. You might want to limp from early/middle position with hands like AJ. Even though it is not a good multiway hand (which would argue for a raise), you should not raise because you are out of position and have a greater chance that your hand could be dominated by a player yet to act, and multiple players may come in anyway. You will give callers better odds to draw against you if you make a hand and they flop a draw. By not raising and keeping the pot smaller, opponent's calls on later streets will be less profitable for them, which is better for you. Also, you will lose information by raising early with hands like AJ. You should almost always raise with AK because AK cannot be out kicked and can only be dominated by AA and KK, but there are several more hands that dominate AJ. If you raise, you will have no idea if a caller dominates your hand. If you do limp and someone raises behind you, you gain information: you could very well be up against AA, AK, or AQ, so you will want to keep that in mind when you decide how to play after the flop. In late position following perhaps one limper, you are in better shape to raise with your AJ. You are in good position and less likely to be dominated by a hand like AA, KK, QQ, JJ, AK or AQ if no one raised in front you, and more likely to dominate a limper with an A and a weaker kicker. Your raise may knock out the blinds as well and get you heads-up or nearly so with a hand you dominate. That makes a raise here more profitable. Playing smaller hold'em hands: Hands with straight or flush potential as well as pocket pairs play well in a mulitway pot. Suited and connected cards have the added benefit of straight and/or flush potential. Hitting a flush or straight is a long shot, but when you do get one, you will almost always win with it, so you want to have it in a pot with lots of players. Same thing goes for pocket pairs, you will only flop a set about one out of 8.5 times, but three of a kind is a huge hand that will often win in a multiway pot, and on top of that, you have a 1 in 3 chance that the board will pair and give you a full house. These hands have the potential to make huge hands, but they will not do so often, so you need many players in the pot to make the payoff worth it if you do catch. Big suited hands play very well mulitway and are usually good enough to play from any position. Big suited hands include AKs-A10s, KQs, KJs, and QJs. In addition to the chance of making the best hand by making a board pair with a solid kicker or better, these hands have the chance to make big flushes and straights. If you are playing a suited Ace instead of suited trash, and you make a flush, it will be the nut flush and not just a flush. If another player makes a smaller flush, you are likely to end up winning a big pot. AKs is best by far because if it pairs on the flop, it will make top pair with the best kicker or better, and it can also make the highest possible straight and/or flush. You would usually raise from any position with AKs, AQs and KQs. If you end up heads-up or nearly so with these hands, they will play just fine. You would probably limp in from early position with other big suited hands like AJs, ATs, KJs, QJs because you want many players to come in to give you good odds if you flop a draw. You would prefer to play a multiway pot with these hands. If you are in late position following several limpers, you should often raise with big suited hands to build a big pot. By raising, you force everyone to cough up an extra bet preflop (it only cost you one bet, but practically doubles the size of the pot), so if you flop a straight or flush draw, you will be getting very profitable odds to draw, and with such a big pot, you will likely get lots of calls from players that cannot win you if you catch. That is what playing solid poker is all about; setting yourself up for the most profitable situations. You could even consider calling a preflop raise cold with big suited hands if the pot is already mulitway. Hands like KTs, QTs and JTs are downgraded to the middle position minimum opening hands because many hands can dominate them, but they still have straight and flush potential. In a loose passive game without much preflop raising, you could probably play them from early position as well. AKs can only make one straight, while JTs can make 4 different straights that will all be the nuts. QTs can only make 3 straights using both cards, and must catch a J to make any straight, and KTs can only make two straights and only by catching both a Q and J. You can raise with medium suited connectors like JTs, T9s, 98s, following several limpers and build a big multiway pot to give yourself very profitable odds to chase should you flop a draw [MJ: This is a bit redundant, as you will have pot odds to draw to a straight or flush almost 100% of the time, so you should not be raising]. Even if the pot was raised, you might still consider playing a medium suited connector near the button if the pot is already multiway because you will be getting great odds to chase if you flop a draw. Most players raise with big cards, so your medium suited connector cards are less likely to be dominated, and even if you are, it is not a big problem because you're not usually looking to win a multiway pot by pairing the board. Playing small hands in late position: You would not play smaller suited connectors like 78s from early or middle position because you don't know how the pot will develop so you can't be sure you will get the multiway pot you want. If you limped in early with 78s and got raised, you could end up trapped with two of your bets in a relatively small pot heads-up against a hand you are probably unlikely to beat. You will not be getting proper odds for your straight or flush draw, and that is exactly the situation you don't want with this type of hand. In late position, you can see the action before you decide whether or not to play. You would probably fold the 78s if only one person limped in front of you. If there was no raise and several players limped in, these hands definitely become playable because you are getting the kind of action you want. They are not as strong as the medium and big suited connectors, so you would seldom raise with them. You will often be folding after the flop, so you would like to see the flop cheaply. Small suited connectors down to 54s have the potential to make 4 straights and/or a flush, and when you hit your hand well in some other way by making two pair or trips, your hand is well disguised. If the flop comes A77, who would expect someone would be in with a 7? Any ace will pay you off. Also, when you completely miss the flop, which will often happen, you can easily get away from the hand. If you don't flop a straight or flush draw (or some very strong hand), you will usually just fold out. If you had a small pair (77 - 22) in the same position following several limpers, you would probably just call, because you will frequently fold after the flop if you miss your set. Small pairs play well multiway, but you will not be chasing if you miss, so you usually want to see the flop as cheaply as possible. Some late position hands that require special consideration are hands like K9s, K8s, Q9s, J9s, and T8s. [MJ: These hands can/should probably not even be played, period unless you are an advanced player.] These hands become playable following many limpers in loose games if you can expect to see a cheap flop in what is likely to end up being a big pot. The problem with these hands is that they can easily end up making second best hands, usually by making top pair with the worst kicker, but also occasionally by making the second best flush or straight. To avoid becoming trapped, you have to be able to let go of these hands if you don't get an excellent flop. If you don't flop a flush or straight draw, two pair, or better, you should fold to any bet. Even if you make top pair with your K or Q, you should still fold if an opponent bets into you. If checked to you, you would usually bet top pair, but if you get raised, you should fold immediately. If you make a flush, you would prefer to see the higher suited card(s) on the board to insure you have the highest possible flush, otherwise you must keep in mind that you could be against a bigger flush. You would never play these types of hands in a multiway pot if they were unsuited, but you might consider playing unsuited hands with straight potential like QJ, QT, JT, and T9 following many limpers. These hands also run a similar increased risk of making second best hands when many players see the flop. If you don't flop a straight draw, two pair or better, you should usually fold to any action. If you do make a straight, you will know if you have the nuts. If a higher possible straight is out, you must keep that in mind. These marginal late position hands can be profitable if played correctly in the right situations, but they have serious potential for disaster by making second best hands which can be difficult to get away from. You don't really give up anything by passing on these weak hands all together. Passing on these types hands is almost always correct anyway, and one mistake can wipe out any small advantage to playing them perfectly. If the pot is raised before you voluntarily enter the pot, you should often fold right there; you should almost never cold call a preflop raise if you are not in the big blind (you will see bad players do it often, but it is a terribly unprofitable play). Unless you are in the big blind or the pot is already multiway, and you have a great hand that plays well multiway, don't call a preflop raise. Don't call preflop raises with hands like AQ or KQ (unless you have some reason to believe the raiser has a weak hand). Most players raise with AA, KK, QQ, JJ, AKs and AK, so if you call with even very good hands, you could easily be getting into a dominated situation. Any flop that hits you could hit the raiser better, and you could easily end up losing a huge pot when you could have folded for free. Of course any time that you believe your hand is better than the raiser's (you have the big pair or AK or it is a loose raiser) you should RERAISE. Calling is a mistake; reraise to get heads up and let them know you have a huge hand and get their reaction. If they cap it, they are representing AA, KK, or AKs. Those are the only 3 profitable hands to make it 4 bets with preflop. That doesn't mean they have it, but if the flop doesn't help you, and you believe they probably have you beat, don't be afraid to dump it right on the flop. Considering the flop, if you give yourself as much as a 1 in 3 chance to have the best hand, check and call your way to the river. Betting to find out where you are usually won't do you any good. Any player that caps it on the flop with less than a premium hand will definitely play back with no improvement, and if you're beat, you'll also get played with, so you're back to check and call. This is exactly the situation where you want to know as much as possible about your opponent. I hope you were paying attention. Most of the time the pot will not be raised when it comes to you, and if it gets raised one time after you call, you call the raise. If it is raised and reraised behind you, you strongly consider folding unless you have a premium hand. That is, unless you have some reason to believe that the reraiser is weak. Several examples of positional considerations have been presented, but endless unique examples will arise in the game. You should always consider how to best achieve the situation you want for your type of hand from the position you are in by calling or raising preflop, and folding when it looks like you will not get the type of action you need to play a particular hand.
91788 Nibs: 494
Member Since: May 9th 2008
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Posted on Jun 27th 2008
If you are under the gun or in an early to middle postion keep faith and only play unless your cards are pocket pair or add up to 21, just keep faith and i promise you will get into the money !!!
90961 Nibs: 2,418
Member Since: Apr 17th 2008
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Posted on Jul 5th 2008
EEK a lot to read here...
BULLs, Wass BRL#20 Winners, February, 2008 * 7 x Wass BRL Champions *
70520 Nibs: 5,033
Member Since: Nov 22nd 2006
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Posted on Aug 22nd 2008  -  Subject: plays
The hands you mentioned like QJ 10J K10 KJ , you must raise preflop and the same counts for PPs. This way you keep your opponents guessing what you have + you can bluff more easy by betting or raising on a scared card that comes up. GL
OEPS! I'm your huckleberry... thats JUST my game! five hundred.. must be a......peache of a hand....
93624 Nibs: 1,332
Member Since: Jun 24th 2008
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Posted on Aug 26th 2008
you have to play with them! poker is boring if you only wait those big hands!
Play with me, lose to me.
80707 Nibs: 4,381
Member Since: Jul 9th 2007
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Posted on Aug 26th 2008
You must be able to realise when you are beat with these hands just like other hands and know how your opponents are playing.  
ciao for now
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