A Response to the "How to make money at micro limits" article

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11992 Nibs: 75,250
Member Since: Dec 19th 2005
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Posted on Sep 17th 2008  -  Subject: A Response to the "How to make money at micro limits" articl
I am a firm believer in the benefit of moving up through the limits and constantly leanring and testing your game. I agree with many of the concepts from the "How to make money at micro limits" article, but am going to share the strategy that I employed at Paradise Poker back in 2004 when I began playing cash games. This was a 6 - 8 table multitabling strategy that worked very well at the time. Some of you may have also seen this in the blog challenge I wrote a couple of months ago. NOTE: THIS IS NOT COPIED FROM ANY SOURCE, 100% MY OWN MATERIAL. __________________________________   When I first started playing back in 2004, I did not succesfully jump straight into the bigger games like some players do. I lost early on and then decided that I needed to start down at the very bottom, and learn my way up. This is a similar strategy to the one I used when I had a lot of success at $2 NL on Paradise Poker. Goal of this strategy: To exploit less experienced players at .01 / .02 and .02 / .04 NL who refuse to let go of top pair, chase draws and generally refuse to lay down hands. NOTE: this type of passive approach works better at full ring games (8 + players) The following are suggested hands to play from different positions on the table. Assuming we are playing a full 10 person table our position at the table is the following (going clockwise around the table starting at the seat left of the big blind and counting the small blind as position or seat 1): Small Blind: seat 1, just to the left of the dealer Big Blind: seat 2 Early position: seats 3, 4, 5 (also referred to as under the gun or UTG +1, UTG + 2 and even UTG + 3) Middle position: seats 6, 7, 8 Late position: seats 9, 10 (also referred to as cutoff and button) Early Position (EP): Limp with any pocket pair (PP) 55-QQ, limp AK, AQ suited, AQ, Raise AA, KK, AK suited (reraise AA and KK) Why are we limping with so many hands? Due to our position on the table, it is more difficult to thin out the field enough to gain position on our opponents (last to act). We are looking to be a little deceptive out of EP and see flops cheaply in an attempt to flop a monster and get paid off by other players limping in with lesser hands. We raise only raise 3 hands because they are power hands from any position and we would prefer to get into heads up confrontations our face a potential to reraisee and get our entire stack in the middle. AA and KK are definite allin preflop hands, AK suited is more up to your discretion and the read of the table. Many players are advocates of pushing allin with AK since seeing 5 cards give you a better chance than if you wiff on the flop and have to decide to push or fold. I am a little more cautious and prefer not to push unless I have a good read on my opponent. Middle Position:  Limp any PP 22-JJ, AJ suited, AQ, KQ suited Raise (or call a raise) AK suited, AQ suited, AA, KK, QQ (reraise AA, KK) Why then are we raising certain hands and not others? With the limping hands, we want to see a flop cheaply. They are strong hands, but can be dominated if we miss or the wrong cards come out on the flop, so we are looking for situations to hit a favourable board and bet into opponents who may otherwise be holding lesser cards. The raising hands are strong enough that even from middle position we are able to show strength and try to thin out the field. if we can get some of the late position players to fold, we can take control of the table by having position on our opponents (be last to act). Once again AA and KK are no brain reraises. We would prefer to call a raise with the other hands in order to gauge the flop texture. QQ often faces weak Ax hands and although we may lose value by not pushing all in with some of these hands, our goal is to exploit players based on the flop and not necessarily preflop allins. There will be a time to push and call with QQ, however it is difficult to pinpoint that time, essentially it is up to the player and their read on the table / opponent. Late Position: Limp any PP 22-1010, AQ, any A2-A10 suited, KQ, KQ suited, QJ suited, KJ suited, J10 suited Raise (or call a raise) JJ-AA, AK, AK suited, AQ suited, AJ suited (reraise AA, KK) Why are we limping with so many hands and raising with just as many? The power of having position on our opponents allows us to put bets into the pot, even on misses, that could take it down for us. The term for betting when the flop does not improve our hand is called continuation betting. We have shown strength by raising preflop and continue to show that image by betting into the flop, regardless of what has hit. If we do take this route, we must be careful not to risk to much, but must make it large enough to be convincing. Figure on something between 2/3 and 3/4 pot. If you get reraised, simply dump your hand. If you get called, be cautious and try to read the board for what your opponent could have or be chasing. If the turn brings a blank (a non useful card for you) take a look at the board again and see if a straight or flush could have hit. If the answer is no, it is at your discretion as to whether or not you bet again, or check to try and hit a river card. I advice against investing too much on bluffs and continuation bets, since many players will call down with weak pairs, simply because they hit something. So essentially we are using our position to our advantage and putting pressure on our opponents, whether we hit or miss, and making them determine whether or not to continue, instead of allowing them to by not betting. Small Blind and Big Blind: Complete or check unraised bets with any connector, suited gapped connector, PP 22-JJ Call with AA, KK, AK suited, AK, AQ suited (reraise AA and KK) Why so weak out of the blinds? Our early position at the table puts us at a significant disadvantage in relation to other limpers. Unless we hold a strong hand, we would prefer to simply limp in and try to flop two pair or a big draw. Since we have alrady invested a bit in the pot, we don't want to just give up if our hand is playable, however we are not looking to invest a lot if our potential to be beaten is significant.  A few final notes: WE DO NOT SLOW PLAY............unless the board contains absolutely no draws, we would prefer to bet when we hit a big pair, or set, even a straight is worth betting if its not obvious.  BE AWARE OF THE DOUBLE RAISE (essentially a min raise)...........players at this limit are notorius for utilizing a min raise to try and milk as much out of an opponent when they have a strong, hidden hand. When facing a min raise, make sure to evaluate what the board shows and what your opponent could have. Calm your aggression and check call (checking to your opponent, and then calling there bet, in an attempt to limit your contribution to the pot and avoid getting reraised) to the river if necessary CHOOSE YOUR Ax HANDS WISELY............. we want to play very strong Ax hands into players that can't drop there weaker Ax hands, and avoid situations where our Ax could be dominated by a better Ax or have to call down in a situation where we shouldn't be calling. RERAISING AND RAISING QQ, JJ AND AK...........QQ or JJ are not raised unless in late or middle position due to the fact that many players like to call with weak Ax and we would like to see a flop before committing many chips. We are looking to raise 4xBB and reraise players 3x their bet. AK can be raised out of the blinds if a player wishes in order to thin the field. If this is done, a continuation bet regardless of the flop is necessary in order to maintain an image of strength. If we are betting into the hand preflop, we do not want to give up easily if we miss, but at the same time we do not want to waste chips on bluffs and double and triple barreling (betting on the turn and river even if we have missed catching a card that helps us). WE WANT TO SEE FLOPS..............The whole premise is to see flops cheaply and be able to react to the board according to what we feel our opponents are holding or what they are drawing too, but also make them pay to see flops when we have a top level hand. In order to be successful, we have to be wiling to adopt a controlled aggressive nature and not just blast the pot when we have top pair. Evaluate the board, evaluate what our opponent could be holding and bet accordingly. Don't be afraid to let players chase (thats how we get paid) just dont' make it cheap for them to call. Punish the weaker players with smart card selection and learn to read the board to get away from dangerous trap like situations. This strategy is not unlike many tight players, except that we adopt a more passive preflop image in order to see more flops cheaply and work on making players pay when we have the best of it on the flop. Continuation betting on missed flops is still suggested, however double and triple barreling on missed turns and rivers is not advised against players who like to call with any flopped pair. I am well aware that this strategy will come under fire by many who prefer a more aggressive preflop style, and I agree that it is definitely not the best against players who have a little more experience. This strategy fits better into levels where players like to see flops and have difficulty laying down. Our passive image protects us from burning chips into multi way pots, but still allows us to be aggressive when we flop a monster and will most likely get paid off due to the hidden strength of our hand. Don't be afraid to mix a few lower suited connectors into the hand selection, but it is wise to do it from late position where you have the ability to bluff at pots and try to steal some chips.  
It's easier to fish if you're the one casting the reel.
70520 Nibs: 5,033
Member Since: Nov 22nd 2006
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Posted on Sep 26th 2008  -  Subject: good post
Thanks for the good post DINGUS!!
OEPS! I'm your huckleberry... thats JUST my game! five hundred.. must be a......peache of a hand....
14584 Nibs: 1,289
Member Since: Jan 9th 2006
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Posted on Oct 6th 2008
Interesting stategy.  I use it a lot myself....but keep forgetting the position part.  LOL
Don't argue with me...
98092 Nibs: 327
Member Since: Sep 30th 2008
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Posted on Oct 10th 2008
ilike this strategy Dingus i,m going to give it try in a 1000 tourney tonight ill let you know if i can curb my enthusiasm with it cheers  
15570 Nibs: 1,071
Member Since: Jan 15th 2006
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Posted on Oct 16th 2008
ilike this strategy Dingus i,m going to give it try in a 1000 tourney tonight ill let you know if i can curb my enthusiasm with it cheers  That isn't really a tournament strategy. Looks on first glance quite sound in early stages though, as it is pretty tight. Don't forget to switch gears, when the blinds get high in respect to your stack, though.  
11992 Nibs: 75,250
Member Since: Dec 19th 2005
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Posted on Oct 17th 2008
Never was made to be a tourney strategy. Its best use is for cash games. A modified version for tourneys would be fine. As stated, good for early on, mid to later stages open up your range for raises to isolate and avoid getting blinded out.
It's easier to fish if you're the one casting the reel.
99109 Nibs: 1,052
Member Since: Oct 18th 2008
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Posted on Nov 1st 2008
Good strategy...tks  
http://www.pokerinside.com/refer/fabiosnarf
105426 Nibs: 515
Member Since: Mar 2nd 2009
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Posted on Mar 2nd 2009
Great Strategy. I am using it and will let you know how it became.
Alexandre de Oliveira Silva On The One Million Road
70520 Nibs: 5,033
Member Since: Nov 22nd 2006
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Posted on Mar 4th 2009  -  Subject: question
I will try this stragety allthough i'm a more agressive player but i have 2 questions  about what i don't understand at this DINGUS. 1- Middle Position:  Limp any PP 22-JJ, AJ suited, AQ, KQ suited Raise (or call a raise) AK suited, AQ suited, AA, KK, QQ (reraise AA, KK)                                                        Are you suggesting by the above not to call a PFR with any other pair, even when the raise is made by a big stack so it would be worth to call and see a flop in case we hit trips? This the same ILP as you say to limp there too with PPs?   2-  If you get reraised, simply dump your hand. In order to get reraised you have to raise yourself first or someone else makes a raise. I assume you mean if you get raised ,(or reraised on the flop by someone IEP who has initially checked), when Cbetting and not preflop?  And if you get raised or reraised on the flop,is there an ecxeption for AA or if you're holding any other overpair as result of  getting dealt a big PP  you shouls also make an ecxeption i assume? Thanks DINGUS for the efforts you always make to learn us something and put your time into these things, and also i want you to know that i appriciate and respect your thoughts highly! 
OEPS! I'm your huckleberry... thats JUST my game! five hundred.. must be a......peache of a hand....
70520 Nibs: 5,033
Member Since: Nov 22nd 2006
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Posted on Mar 5th 2009  -  Subject: tried
Allthough i give a response after trying i would still like an answer to my previous questions Dingus, and i have one question added here. I tried it no $0.25/0.50c tables and i lost a lot because when i finally raised i got no callers, everybody folded! Or does it nor count for these limits?
OEPS! I'm your huckleberry... thats JUST my game! five hundred.. must be a......peache of a hand....
83616 Nibs: 1,821
Member Since: Oct 22nd 2007
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Posted on Mar 6th 2009
veerrryyy nice.
11992 Nibs: 75,250
Member Since: Dec 19th 2005
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Posted on Mar 12th 2009
Allthough i give a response after trying i would still like an answer to my previous questions Dingus, and i have one question added here. I tried it no $0.25/0.50c tables and i lost a lot because when i finally raised i got no callers, everybody folded! Or does it nor count for these limits? We certainly don't want to just fold every single pocket pair that we are dealt. If you are up against a big stack, then you certainly should call a raise, for the implied odds of doubling up if you catch a set and they can't let go of their hand.   The idea of dumping your hand into a reraise is based on the idea that: 1) We don't want to play too many pots out of position 2) We don't want to continually calls raises with less than stellar holdings, since players are the lower limits usually raise on fairly predictable hands, usually containing an A or K or a pair. That being said, catching onto someones raising pattern can provide benefits when big cards don't hit and you can bet them off a missed flop. Its going to be a situation by situation decision based on position, strength of hand and quality of opponent.   I admire you using this strategy at 50NL, but as I stated, this type of passive aggressive style works better at limits of $10NL and less where opponents understand the game a little less. $50NL requires you to open up your range in late position and raise with more of the bigger PPs 1010 and higher as well as your big Ax hands from middle position and 55+ and suited Ax / big Ax, Kx, connectors, etc from late position. Play too passively at tables where people pay a little more attention and you won't get much action. And if you play this strategy at 6max tables, you'll get killed. It's WAY too passive for short handed games. You'll never get paid.
It's easier to fish if you're the one casting the reel.
70520 Nibs: 5,033
Member Since: Nov 22nd 2006
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Posted on Mar 15th 2009  -  Subject: understood
ok thanks Dingus, i understand where you're going to.
OEPS! I'm your huckleberry... thats JUST my game! five hundred.. must be a......peache of a hand....
Displaying #1-13 of 13 total posts

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