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cplbear posted on Nov 30th 2013 ...

shutupov we picked up a few very active players on ehteam you should come back we top 5 again
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hyarissent posted on Nov 19th 2013 ...

Vice President Biden attended Tuesday’s installation of Pope Francis at the Vatican.<br> House Minority Leader <b>Nancy</b> <b>Pelosi</b> did, <b>too,</b> along with <b>other</b> lawmakers. But there was <b>no</b> U.S. ambassador in the crowd at St. Peter’s <b>Square.</b> That post has been <b>vacant</b> since November, when Miguel Diaz, a theologian, left the job to teach at the University <b>of</b> Dayton. Read full article <b>&#62;&#62;</b> MIT professor Keeril Makan, a musician and composer acclaimed for his technique of layering recorded and live sounds, has been awarded the prestigious Luciano Berio Rome Prize for musical composition by <b>the</b> American Academy in Rome for 2008-2009.The<br> prize, announced Thursday, April 10, in New <b>York,</b> carries a stipend of $24,000, and work and living accommodations for 11 months at the <b>academy.Makan,<br></b> assistant professor of music, originally trained as a violinist. He describes his music as an outgrowth of the western classical tradition, using familiar instruments and other musical traditions <b>in</b> new ways. Makan's <b>music</b> moves fluidly <b>among</b> disparate sounds, weaving <b>them</b> into instrumental combinations that range from small chamber ensembles to works <b>for</b> orchestra. Innovative<br> and exploratory, it has required the composer to develop hieroglyph-like notations for musicians performing his work.<br> In a saxophone piece, "Voice within Voice," for <b>example,</b> a <b>row</b> of jagged markings that look like shark's teeth means "put your teeth on the <b>reed</b> and grind." But notation is not where the process of composing starts for Makan, a 36-year-old native of New Jersey. "I write by physically interacting with the instrument I'm composing for.<br> <b>If I'm</b> writing for the oboe, I'll play it in as many ways as I can imagine," he says. "As I work, <b>new</b> musical possibilities develop. This is how I get the raw materials for a piece; I record myself, then I figure <b>out</b> how I'll work <b>with</b> the material."Makan will devote the 11-month residency in Rome to working on three major <b>pieces,</b> he says.One<br> project will be to compose "Tracker," a five-part chamber opera in which technological instruments of the <b>past,</b> such as 19th-century contraptions for measuring pulse and motion, are <b>linked</b> <b>thematically</b> to current technologies and to the impact of technology on the imagination and emotional experience.Sketches for "Tracker" <b>are</b> now taped in five columns to the wall of Makan's MIT office, a small room packed with books and musical gear. Photographs<br> by 19th century scientist Etienne-Jules Marey top each column; poem-shaped segments of Jena Osman's libretto spill downward like adding <b>machine</b> paper. There<br> <b>are</b> no visible musical notes.In<br> addition to the opera, Makan's plan for Rome is to complete a work for electric guitar and orchestra, commissioned by the American Composers Orchestra, to be premiered this November at Carnegie Hall.<br> He <b>will</b> also finish a trio for flute, viola and harp, commissioned by the Harvard Musical Association, <b>for</b> violist and MIT professor Marcus Thompson.A<br> tall order for 11 months, but Makan, who owns neither a car nor a television, finds economy in technology. <b>He</b> relies on Finale, a notation program, for experimenting with time and modeling, and on a digital audio workstation for analyzing the frequency components of pre-recorded sounds, <b>en</b> route to creating new ones.Recent MIT winners of the Rome Prize include Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Junot Diaz, associate <b>professor</b> in Writing and Humanistic Studies, and John Ochsendorf, associate professor <b>of</b> architecture.A national competition, the Rome Prize is awarded annually to 15 emerging artists in <b>various</b> fields. A version of this article appeared in MIT Tech Talk on April 16, 2008 (download PDF).How can universities manage facilities and services while balancing the books? Join our #HElivechat 22 Mar 12pm GMTAs Northampton vice-chancellor <b>Nick</b> Petford says, university procurement is not a sexy subject, but an important one.The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills has predicted it will face £150m limit on how much <b>it</b> can spend <b>in</b> <b>2013-14,</b> reductions increasing <b>further</b> to £280 in 2014-15.And with the sector spending in the <b>region</b> of £10bn every year on buying goods and services, universities are looking to reorganise – through outsourcing or collaborative procurement – to reduce costs.But as higher education institutions increasingly look to outsource campus services <b>including</b> catering and facilities management, staff and students are responding in their numbers against these acts of privatisation which they feel will affect their university experience.Staff and students currently in their fifth week of occupation against the outsourcing of key services at the University of Sussex are not the only ones expressing concern over a lack of clarity and communication behind university <a href = "http://maremaru.net/trapompho/">decision-making, arguing</a> the move will jeopardise employment terms and conditions.London<br> Metropolitan University is using a private firm to reshape its non-teaching services. Falmouth University plans to move academic support staff to <b>a</b> private company, FX Plus.<br> And in November, the University of Central Lancashire became the first public university to apply to become a private company.Some of the key issues at hand:• Fear that universities are becoming more like businesses• The growing view of students as 'consumers'• Impact of privatisation on the student and staff experience• <b>Commercialisation</b> of learning on campus• Implications for public role of the university"If universities are profit-driven, this destroys the possibility that they have any level of community responsibility," said Rachel Wenstone, NUS vice-president for higher education, in response to the Sussex occupation, "and it means students will not have <b>the</b> opportunity to shape what that looks like."Amid widespread opposition to outsourcing, what are its benefits – and alternatives? In 2012, the University of <b>Northampton</b> launched the 1 Billion Pound Challenge, a scheme <b>that</b> aims to support local economies and bring wider community <b>benefits,</b> while at the same <b>time</b> helping universities and colleges develop efficient, sustainable procurement practices. "Building relationships initially through procurement could prove a route in for <b>academic</b> activities including research, consultancy and student placements," <b>said</b> Petford of the move.Meanwhile, research by Sheffield Hallam University in 2012 found facilities management service delivery <b>at</b> a turning point across the board with traditional models failing to meet customer <b>needs.</b> The study found what was driving companies in a range of sectors was the chance to gain innovation in service delivery within tight budgetary restraints.Does<br> the same apply to universities? Higher education <b>budgets</b> are <b>tight,</b> but is the answer to balancing the books in outsourcing services, or rather, making use of a university's resources and expertise on campus? Is it a simple <b>case</b> of homegrown verses imported services? Or more about collaboration between <b>universities</b> and private providers, staff and students, and the growing field of <b>social</b> enterprise?Join our live chat Friday 22 March 12-2pm GMT to discuss the best models <b>for</b> universities and how they <b>can</b> be implemented. Is the view that private providers are just out to make <b>money</b> from universities fair, or are there other factors to consider?If <b>you</b> would like to be on the panel, please email claire.shaw@guardian.co.ukYou can also follow the debate live on Twitter using the hashtag #HElivechatPanel to be confirmed This content is brought to you by Guardian Professional.<br> To get more articles like this direct to your inbox, become a member <b>of</b> <b>the</b> Higher Education Network.Live<br> Q&AManagement, admin and servicesFundingFinanceInnovationCommunications <b>and</b> marketingInfrastructureStudent experiencePartnershipsEngaging businessEmployabilityPrivate providersHigher educationClaire Shawguardian.co.uk &copy; 2013 Guardian News <b>and</b> Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved.<br> | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | <b>More</b> Feeds On July 10, 2010, the <b>European</b> Space Agency’s Rosetta <b>probe</b> flew by the asteroid 21 Lutetia, which at the time was the largest asteroid ever to have been visited by a spacecraft. The fly-by occurred 282 million miles from Earth; close-up images taken by the probe revealed cracks and craters running across Lutetia’s surface, evidence of the asteroid’s long and <b>battered</b> history.Now an international team of researchers from France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United <b>States</b> has analyzed Lutetia’s surface images, and found that underneath its cold and cracked exterior, the asteroid may in fact have once harbored a molten-hot, metallic core. The findings suggest that Lutetia, despite billions <b>of</b> years of impacts, may have retained <b>its</b> original structure — a preserved remnant of the very earliest days of <b>the</b> solar system.<br> The <b>results</b> are published in a series of three papers in the journals Science and Planetary Space Science <b>(PSS).</b> Benjamin Weiss, an associate professor of planetary sciences in MIT’s Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, says a <b>melted</b> core within Lutetia may exemplify a “hidden diversity” within the greater asteroid belt.<br> “There might be many bodies that have cores and interesting <b>interiors</b> that we never noticed, because they’re covered by <b>unmelted</b> surfaces,” says Weiss, who is a co-author on both Science papers and lead author for the paper in <b>PSS.<br></b> “The asteroid belt may be more interesting than it seems on the surface.”More than a rubble pileMost asteroids careening through <a href = "http://www.yomuslim.com/index.php?do=/blog/35717/chelsea-touch-down-in-bangkok-for-tour-of-asia-â-video/">the asteroid</a> belt, between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, are scrambled versions of their former selves: essentially mashed-up masses of rock and metal that have collided and cooled <b>over</b> billions of years. These rocky conglomerations are relatively small and light, with voids and cracks in their interiors that make them very porous. It had been thought that the vast <b>majority</b> of these bodies never melted to form dense, metallic cores, but instead are just primordial piles of space rocks and dust.In contrast, the Rosetta team <b>—</b> <b>led</b> <b>by</b> Holger Sierks of the Max-Planck Institute for Solar System Research and Martin Pätzold of the Rheinisches Institut für Umweltforschung, both in Germany — found that Lutetia is <b>extremely</b> dense. The team <b>drew</b> up a model of the asteroid’s shape, based on images taken by the Rosetta probe. The researchers then calculated Lutetia’s volume, mass and finally its <b>density,</b> which they found, in collaboration with the MIT team, to be greater than most meteorite samples <b>measured</b> on Earth. Lutetia fly-by <b>from</b> Science News on Vimeo.<br> The asteroid’s density would make sense if it were completely solid, free of voids or cracks.<br> However, Rosetta researchers measured the asteroid’s surface craters and identified huge fractures throughout, suggesting the asteroid is relatively porous, a finding that didn’t quite square with the team’s density measurements — <b>after</b> all, the more porous an object, the less dense it should be. Weiss and his colleagues, including MIT professor Richard Binzel and former MIT professor Linda T.<br> Elkins-Tanton, now head of the Carnegie Institution for Science’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, offered a likely explanation for the discrepancy: Perhaps the space rock contains a dense metallic core, with a once melted interior underneath its fractured crust. The direct observations from Lutetia may provide evidence for a theory developed last year by <b>Weiss,</b> Elkins-Tanton and MIT’s Maria Zuber. The team studied samples of chondrites, <b>meteorites</b> on Earth that have remained unchanged since their early formation. They found samples from the meteorite Allende that were strongly magnetized, and theorized that such magnetization most likely occurred in an asteroid with a melted, metallic core.<br> The theory was seen as a big shift from the traditional picture of most asteroids as primordial, unmelted objects. <b>Planetary</b> arrested developmentIf a metallic core does indeed exist, Lutetia would be <b>the</b> first asteroid known to be partially differentiated: having a melted <b>interior</b> overlain by progressively cooler layers.<br> The asteroid would also represent a snapshot of early planetary development.<br> <b>As</b> the solar system <b>began</b> to take form 4.5 billion years ago, planets formed from collisions first of <b>dust,</b> then of larger chunks of rock. Numerous chunks remained relatively small, cooling quickly to form asteroids, while others grew with each collision, eventually reaching the size of planets. These large bodies generated an immense amount of heat <b>—</b> but as a <b>new</b> planet melted from the inside, <b>it</b> cooled from the outside, forming a crust around a molten core.<br> According to Weiss, Lutetia is a case of arrested development. <b>The</b> asteroid may have reached a size large enough to <b>develop</b> and retain a melting core, and then simply avoided the larger collisions that accelerated planet formation.“The<br> planets … don’t retain a record of <b>these</b> early differentiation processes,” Weiss says.<br> “So this asteroid may be a relic of the first events of melting in a body.”Erik<br> Asphaug, a professor of planetary science at <b>the</b> University of California at Santa <b>Cruz,</b> studies “hit-and-run” <b>collisions</b> between early planetary bodies. He says the work by Weiss and his colleagues is a solid step toward resolving how certain asteroids like Lutetia may <b>have</b> evolved. “We’ve had decades of cartoon speculation, <b>and</b> here’s speculation that’s anchored in physical understanding of how the interiors of these bodies would evolve,” says <b>Asphaug,</b> who <b>was</b> not involved in <b>the</b> research. “It’s like getting through the first 100 pages of a <b>novel,</b> and you don’t know where it’s leading, but it feels like the beginnings of a coherent picture.”Weiss<br> says while the images and measurements of Lutetia are intriguing evidence for a partially differentiated asteroid, a “smoking gun” could be provided by a sample taken directly from an asteroid.<br> Binzel <b>and</b> Weiss are part of a NASA team that plans to launch a probe to an asteroid in <a href = "http://prague.tv/forum/viewpost.php?id=11479">2016, which</a> will take a sample and <b>return</b> <b>it</b> to Earth.<br> Weiss says there are a number of hurdles he and his colleagues will have to surmount before obtaining definitive evidence for a molten core. “The challenge is, the body has to be big,” Weiss says.<br> “If it’s not big, then it’s not going to retain a molten interior. The problem then is, all the big bodies are not going to be <b>easily</b> excavated.<br> So it’s sort of a Catch-22.” After 13 years, and no appearance in the N.C.A.A. tournament, Northwestern begins a search for a new coach after the firing of Bill Carmody. Exactly a month after Greece closed the state broadcaster ERT in a cost-cutting move, a bare-bones version <b>of</b> the service is back on the air.<br> The MIT Sea Grant College Program has announced that nominations are now open for the Doherty Professorship in Ocean Utilization. All non-tenured MIT faculty members from any Institute department are eligible. Department heads may submit <b>one</b> nomination every year.<br> The deadline for nominations is Nov.<br> 16. The person <b>appointed</b> to the chair will receive $25,000 per year for two years, beginning July <b>1,</b> 2012.Endowed<br> by the Henry L. and Grace Doherty Charitable Foundation, the two-year chair opens the way for promising, non-tenured professors to undertake <b>marine-related</b> research that will <b>further</b> innovative uses of the ocean's resources. There are no restrictions on the area of research, and any aspect of marine use and/or management may be addressed, whether <b>social,</b> political, environmental, economic or technical.Final selection will be made by a committee that includes the vice president and dean for research, the dean of engineering, the dean of science, the chairman of <b>the</b> Sea Grant Committee and the director of the MIT Sea Grant College Program, following review and recommendations from the Sea Grant Faculty Committee.<br> The vice president for research will <b>appoint</b> the new <b>Doherty</b> Professor in January 2012. <b>While</b> serving as the Doherty Assistant or Associate Professor of Ocean Utilization, the incumbent cannot hold another MIT-funded chair.In 2011, the award went to Kripa Varanasi, Assistant Professor <b>in</b> the Department of Mechanical Engineering, for his work titled, "Nanoengineered Surfaces for Hydrate Mitigation in Subsea Oil and Gas Operations."<br> Varanasi will conduct fundamental research <b>on</b> emulsions under subsea conditions.<br> Currently, very little is known — for example, the physicochemical <b>and</b> environmental effects of the demulsifiers used to <b>break</b> down oil in the Macondo oil well blowout are unknown.Anyone<br> wishing to <b>be</b> nominated should contact his or her department head. <b>For</b> nomination procedures and selection criteria, consult the website, or contact Kathy de Zengotita, Room E38-330, 617-253-7042, <b>kdez@mit.edu.</b> Imagine if you could drink a glass of water just by inserting a solid wire into it and sucking on it as though it were a soda straw.<br> It turns out that if you were tiny enough, that method would work just fine — and wouldn’t even require the suction to start.New<br> research carried out at MIT and elsewhere has <b>demonstrated</b> for the first time that when inserted into a pool of liquid, nanowires — wires that are <b>only</b> hundreds of nanometers (billionths of a meter) across — naturally draw the liquid upward in a thin film that coats the surface of the wire.<br> The finding could have applications in microfluidic devices, biomedical research <b>and</b> inkjet printers.The phenomenon <b>had</b> been predicted by theorists, but never observed because the process is too small to be seen by optical microscopes; electron <b>microscopes</b> need to operate in a vacuum, which would cause most liquids to evaporate almost instantly.<br> To overcome this, the MIT team used an ionic liquid called DMPI-TFSI, which remains stable even in a powerful vacuum.<br> Though the observations used this specific liquid, the results are believed to apply to most liquids, including water.The results are published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology by a team of researchers led by Ju <b>Li,</b> an MIT professor <b>of</b> nuclear science and engineering and materials <b>science</b> and engineering, along with researchers at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Pittsburgh, and Zhejiang University in China.While<br> Li says this research intended to explore the basic <b>science</b> of liquid-solid interactions, it could lead <b>to</b> <b>applications</b> in inkjet printing, or for making a lab on a chip. <a href = "http://seebuybye.com/author/mobscompberg/">“We’re really</a> <b>looking</b> at fluid flow at an unprecedented small length scale,” Li says — so unexpected new phenomena could emerge as the research continues.At molecular scale, Li says, “the liquid tries to cover the solid surface, and it gets sucked up by capillary action.” At the smallest scales, when the liquid forms a film less than 10 <b>nanometers</b> thick, <b>it</b> moves as a smooth layer (called a “precursor film”); as the film gets thicker, an instability (called a Rayleigh instability) sets in, causing droplets to form, but the droplets remain connected via the precursor film.<br> In some cases, these droplets continue <b>to</b> move up <b>the</b> nanowire, while in other cases the <b>droplets</b> <b>appear</b> <b>stationary</b> even as the liquid within them flows upward.The <b>difference</b> between the smooth precursor film and the beads, Li says, <b>is</b> that in the thinner film, each molecule of liquid <b>is</b> close enough to directly interact, through quantum-mechanical effects, with the molecules of the solid buried beneath it; this force suppresses the Rayleigh instability that would otherwise cause beading. But with or <b>without</b> beading, the upward flow of the liquid, defying the pull of gravity, is a continuous process that could be harnessed for small-scale liquid transport.Although<br> this upward pull is always present <b>with</b> wires at this tiny scale, the effect can be further <b>enhanced</b> in various ways: Adding an <b>electric</b> voltage on the wire increases the force, as does a slight change in the profile of the wire so that it tapers toward one end. The researchers used nanowires made of different materials — silicon, zinc oxide and tin oxide, <b>as</b> well as two-dimensional graphene — to demonstrate that this process applies to many different materials.Nanowires are less than one-tenth the diameter of fluidic devices now used in biological and medical research, such as micropipettes, and one-thousandth the diameter of hypodermic needles.<br> At these small scales, the researchers found, a solid nanowire is just as effective at holding and transferring liquids as a hollow tube. This smaller scale might pave the way for new kinds of microelectromechanical systems to carry out research <b>on</b> materials at a molecular level.The methodology <b>the</b> researchers developed allows them to study <b>the</b> interactions between solids and liquid flow “at almost the smallest scale you could <b>define</b> a fluid <b>volume,</b> which is 5 to 10 nanometers across,” Li says. <b>The</b> team now plans to examine <b>the</b> behavior of different liquids, using a “sandwich” of transparent solid membranes <b>to</b> enclose a liquid, such as water, for examination in a transmission electron microscope. This will allow “more systematic studies of solid-liquid interactions,” Li says — interactions that are relevant to corrosion, <b>electrodeposition</b> and the operation of batteries.Erich Stach, head of the Electron Microscopy Group at Brookhaven National Laboratory in <b>New</b> York, says, "The dynamic observations from Huang and colleagues provide fascinating insight <b>into</b> the <b>mechanisms</b> of fluid flow at the deep nanoscale, and demonstrate <b>that</b> it is possible to deliver controlled volumes of liquid for novel applications in nanotechnology."The research was supported by Sandia National Laboratories, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the National <b>Science</b> Foundation.<br> The Dominican Republic defeated Caribbean <b>neighbors</b> Puerto Rico 3-0 to win the World Baseball Classic on Tuesday.<br> The Foo Fighters frontman made an impassioned plea in his 45-minute keynote address. This article first appeared in the <b>Autumn</b> 2012 issue of Energy Futures, the magazine of the MIT Energy Initiative.<br> Subscribe today.Prizes<br> have long been used to induce solutions to national challenges. Between the 16th and 19th centuries, prizes yielded the vaccine inoculation, the lifeboat, a method of <b>calculating</b> longitude at sea, new food-preservation techniques, and more. But by the late 19th century, prizes had largely been replaced by two other <b>mechanisms:</b> patents and grants. However, those tools have limitations. Patents lead to innovation only in areas where inventions have commercial potential; and given the structure of <b>government</b> funding, grants are awarded to a narrow range of eligible recipients.As<br> a result, prizes have <b>been</b> making a comeback. “Prizes are an incentive mechanism that is particularly interesting when you want to specify the kinds of innovations you’re looking for and when you want <b>to</b> diversify the base of potential innovators,” says Fiona Murray, the David Sarnoff Professor of Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management in the MIT Sloan <a href = "http://forum.rojadirecta.es/member.php?1692868-arkiny">School of</a> Management. Accordingly, <b>in</b> early 2011, the Obama administration established regulations explicitly designed to accelerate the adoption of “ambitious prizes in areas of national priority.”For<br> Murray, the growing emphasis on prizes as a policy tool raises questions: What sorts of prizes work and for what; and how should prizes be structured to elicit innovation relating to the particular problems we care about? Current literature on the topic includes extensive anecdotal evidence and a “fairly significant body of economic theory that creates models of how prizes should work,” Murray says.<br> But <b>there</b> is little formal analysis of empirical evidence <b>from</b> actual prizes — especially big prizes — and how they function “on the ground.”To fill that gap, she set <b>out</b> <b>to</b> perform a systematic study <b>of</b> an ongoing “Grand Innovation Prize.”<br> Her goals were <b>to</b> gather insight into how a prize works in practice, and then compare that empirical evidence to the ideas <b>of</b> the economists who study prizes and the advocates and policymakers who design them.<br> Seeing how those perceptions differ could help lead to the more effective use of prizes to stimulate innovation in areas where patents and grants may fail.The<br> energy focusOne area of national concern where prizes are particularly relevant is energy. “Energy is an area where we’ve got lots of core underlying skills and <b>expertise.<br></b> But are <b>they</b> being focused on the right kinds of problems and on technology that fulfills the right sorts of technical criteria?” Murray asks.<br> It’s also an area where patents and grants have <b>limited</b> effectiveness.<br> In energy, she says, “it’s especially hard because the kinds of things that you might want — like a super-efficient vehicle — aren’t really valued by customers and because lots of externalities — like carbon dioxide emissions — aren’t really being priced.”<br> With technological advances being under valued, profit-seeking inventors have little interest. In that situation, a prize is a good mechanism to focus attention and elicit new ideas and solutions.Among<br> the many energy-related prizes offered recently, one of the biggest and most publicized is the Progressive Insurance <b>Automotive</b> X-Prize (PIAXP).<br> In late 2009, the PIAXP offered a $10 million cash prize to teams that <b>produced</b> clean vehicles that exceeded 100 miles per gallon equivalent and could be manufactured on a commercial <b>scale.<br></b> In addition to being a model Grand Innovation Prize, the PIAXP was supported by the X-Prize Foundation, which <b>has</b> had a presence on the MIT campus since 2007 through the X-Prize Lab@MIT.<br> Murray decided that the PIAXP would make an ideal case <b>study.Her</b> first task was to develop a formal analytical methodology that was comprehensive, generalizable and could capture the essence <b>of</b> any prize being <b>evaluated.</b> Her approach uses both qualitative and <b>quantitative</b> methods to evaluate three dimensions of a prize: its objectives; its design, including initial specifications and incentives, qualification rules and <b>award</b> governance; and its performance, that is, its success in engendering innovation.With<br> permission from the X-Prize Foundation, Murray, graduate student Georgina Amy Campbell SM ’11 of the Engineering Systems Division, and their collaborators began gathering <b>information.<br></b> They interviewed participating teams, as well as the <b>PIAXP</b> organizers and sponsors; they observed key events; and they <b>performed</b> periodic surveys to understand the incentives, organizational efforts and <b>technical</b> outcomes involved. They then compared specific aspects of the PIAXP with findings from <b>theoretical</b> analyses and with views put forth by policymakers and other prize advocates.Some surprising observationsOne striking feature of the PIAXP is the sheer number of participants.<br> At the start of the competition, 111 teams entered 136 <b>vehicles.<br></b> The teams were largely supported by private money, generally provided by team members and their friends and family. Collectively, the teams spent far more on the task than the winners would get in the prize purse.<br> Indeed, three individual teams spent more than <b>they</b> could have won in prize money.Those <b>observations</b> demonstrate a central feature of today’s prizes: They are intended to maximize effort, not efficiency. Theory assumes that prizes should be designed to elicit an efficient level of effort, that is, the maximum amount of innovation in the most productive and efficient way. “If you tell an economist that a hundred people showed <b>up</b> with new ideas, they’re horrified because they say that’s incredibly inefficient. All that <b>duplication</b> of effort!” Murray says.<br> <a href = "http://www.letstalk24.co.uk/users/sephaeling/profile/">“But if</a> you’re not quite sure what the solution should look like and you want to focus attention on something, then you actually don’t mind <b>the</b> fact that lots of people are turning up and coming with novel ideas.” MEXICO CITY — For generations, Mexico has been widely seen in the United States as a Third World neighbor, a source of cheap labor, illegal immigration and <b>drugs.<br></b> But now, Mexico’s growing economic might is transforming relations between the two countries, foreshadowing a new balance of <b>power</b> that was hinted at in President Obama’s visit to the region Thursday and <b>Friday.</b> Read <b>full</b> article &#62;&#62;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Nearly <b>a</b> quarter of colonoscopies <b>in</b> patients over age 70 were “potentially inappropriate,” a new analysis finds. NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. stocks fell on Tuesday, buffeted by fears of rising interest rates, a sell-off in the energy <b>sector,</b> including Exxon Mobil Corp. , and a drop in the shares of heavy equipment maker Caterpillar Inc.<br> . ATLANTIC CITY, N.J.<br> -- Kevin Anderson scored 21 points and third-seeded Richmond won a defensive battle with Rhode Island, posting a 55-45 victory in the quarterfinals of the Atlantic 10 Conference tournament on Friday night. This animation shows two different "spanning trees" for a simple graph, a grid like those used in much scientific computing. The speedups promised by a new MIT algorithm <b>require</b> "low-stretch" spanning trees (green), in which the paths between neighboring nodes don't become excessively long (red).<br> Images courtesy of the researchers <b>In</b> <b>the</b> run-up to the Nov. 4 presidential election, the News <b>Office</b> has asked MIT experts <b>to</b> weigh in on the presidential candidates, their policy ideas and aspects of the campaign.<br> In <b>this</b> final installment in the series, Charles Stewart III, the Kenan Sahin (1963) Distinguished Professor of Political Science and head of MIT's Department of Political Science, examines issues of voting security. Q: In light of concerns over <b>voting</b> in 2000 and 2004, how <b>secure</b> are voting systems for 2008?A: The more experience we have with voting systems, the more we realize there's a real distinction between security and reliability. There <b>have</b> been some well-publicized <b>cases</b> where teams of experts have exposed security vulnerabilities with electronic systems, <b>and</b> there have been other cases where researchers have "hacked" into systems.<br> But there still isn't any hard evidence of major security problems emerging in actual <b>elections.</b> However, there <b>continue</b> <b>to</b> be an unnerving number of cases where systems are shown to be unreliable.<br> For instance, Premier Election Solutions (formerly Diebold) recently reported that a bug in the software that accepts and counts election results from individual voting machines <b>has</b> a flaw that can result in some ballots being dropped from the system before they <b>are</b> counted. It's a stretch to call this a security problem, but it's not a stretch to call it a reliability problem.The<br> reliability problems aren't just with electronic voting machines.<br> The Premier Election Solutions example applies to optically scanned ballots as well as to electronic machines.I still am confident that votes are counted better now than they were in 2000, but we still have a long way to go before anything close to perfection is achieved.Q: Have any significant gains been made in terms of security of voting machine or paper ballots?A: I think that most computer scientists would say that no real gains have been made with the electronic systems because they are inherently insecure and unreliable. Even the addition of "paper backups" to <b>electronic</b> machines hasn't been a panacea.<br> (Again, the Premier example I mentioned before is a <b>good</b> example <b>--</b> it is possible to compare <b>the</b> <b>paper</b> reports generated by the voting <b>machines</b> with the electronic versions that remain after the download.<br> <b>However,</b> almost no one has been doing this comparison -- and these are the professional election administrators.)The<br> physical security of paper ballots (and of <b>electronic</b> machines) is probably better because states are now more aware of the need to establish a "chain <b>of</b> custody" of voting machines and ballots. For instance, in a lot of states, officials used to allow poll workers to take the machines home the night before the election.<br> These so-called "sleepovers" for the voting machines made it easier for the poll workers to get the precincts opened for voting <a href = "http://www.actionarcadegames.info/members/hurdtabbo/">on Election</a> Day, but raised questions about opportunities for tampering. <b>Sleepovers</b> are going the way of the dodo.<br> So, again, I think things are better now than in 2000. However, we are much more <b>aware</b> of how informally elections are run in the United States, which continues to provide Election Day horror stories.Q:<br> <b>What</b> <b>innovations</b> do you see coming in terms of voting systems?A: I <b>continue</b> to be amazed <b>that</b> the major voting machine companies don't adopt an open source model of voting machine software. Computer experts will tell you that open source election software won't guarantee security, <b>either,</b> but it would allay fears of the public, and probably allow the <b>most</b> egregious software errors to be caught. One of the barriers to the development of a robust electronic voting machine market is the lingering distrust that many elements of the public have in the quality of the software.Q: Should the nation adopt <b>a</b> system of voting identification cards to protect the election process?A: It's pretty clear that voting identification has become highly politicized, with Republicans believing that more stringent voting identification will end high levels of fraudulent voting, and Democrats believing that these ID laws will intimidate minority voters and disenfranchise the elderly. Republicans <b>love</b> these laws and Democrats hate them.<br> It's pretty clear that both sides have engaged in a great deal of hyperbole in making their cases. Accusations of large-scale fraudulent voting almost always <b>dissolve.</b> And, while it is certainly true that certain types of people have a harder time getting <b>ID</b> cards (such as the poor and the elderly), I have a strong suspicion that the lack of identification <b>is</b> nowhere close to <b>the</b> main reasons these folks don't vote.That said, I've always believed that <b>there</b> is a compromise that would achieve what both the left and the right want achieved. Have every state automatically register every 18 year-old to vote and send them a vote ID card.<br> The left would get universal, automatic registration; the right would get a voter <b>ID</b> card. But, that's my <b>own</b> personal pipe dream.Q: If you suspect a problem <b>while</b> voting, what should you do?A: It depends on what the <b>problem</b> is, but in general, you should talk to the poll worker who is in charge of the voting precinct right away.<br> Don't wait until you've checked out, because there's no way to undo a vote <b>once</b> you've checked out of the precinct.<br> If there are registration issues, voters may also insist that they be given a provisional ballot, allowing them to resolve the registration problem the next day at <b>the</b> local election department (or town clerk) <b>office.</b> I, myself, have observed one precinct in Cambridge where people were just turned <b>away</b> from <b>voting</b> when <b>there</b> was a <b>minor</b> registration question, rather than even being told they could cast a provisional ballot (to <b>be</b> clear: these were people who were registered, <b>or</b> thought they should be on the registration list, but there was some question about the <b>registration).</b> When poll workers <b>say</b> there is no <b>way</b> to clear up registration problems on Election Day, they aren't following the rules. Service level agreements in the cloud computing market are skewed in the <b>favor</b> of providers, can <b>be</b> difficult for customers to <b>decipher</b> and in some cases are rigid and non-negotiable. Those are some of the findings from the Cloud Standards Customer Council, a user advocacy group that recently reviewed SLAs from some of the industry&#x2019;s largest providers.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; A plane chartered by a small Peruvian gold mining company with nine people on board crashed on <b>Wednesday</b> in northern Peru, the company, Retamas, said. A man in India has been arrested <b>after</b> his newborn grandson was sold over Facebook for the equivalent of $15,000&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; THE QUESTION Even after treatment, depression sometimes comes back. Among teenagers, what might <b>contribute</b> to this recurrence? -- The biggest Mini in new-car showrooms isn't so mini in size and price. OTTAWA -- Blake Wheeler had two goals and an assist and Tim Thomas extended his winning streak <b>against</b> Ottawa to 11 games and the Boston Bruins scored four times in the first en route to a 4-1 win over the Senators on Tuesday night. The big idea: A small <b>Chicago</b> South Side business gambles that "green" will mean
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hyarissent posted on Nov 19th 2013 ...

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hyarissent posted on Nov 18th 2013 ...

Venezuelan President <b>Hugo</b> Chávez has strongly defended his economic record after a turbulent year in which the country has been rocked by <b>recession</b> and 30 percent inflation.<br> For the last decade, I have celebrated my December birthday by trekking to the Loehmann’s flagship store on Seventh Avenue in Manhattan.Recent spying disclosures have opened the trade-offs between civil liberties and security to <b>the</b> broadest and best-informed public debate in many years.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The Red Bull driver, who has been feuding with his teammate Sebastian Vettel, signed a contract to race Porsche sports cars next year.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Once more, with feeling "Why We <b>Get</b> Fat" (Knopf, $24.95) Testing the new $400 juicer from Hurom. Only 5 percent of U.S. imports come from <b>Japan,</b> but among those products are some of the most well-known among consumers. Reading on mobile? See the trailer here Rather more lively than most low-budget independent <b>mumblecore</b> movies, Adam Leon's promising debut has <b>a</b> storyline that follows two foul-mouthed teenage African-American graffiti artists, Malcolm and Sofia, around New York for two hot summer days.<br> They aim to beg, borrow or steal the $500 needed to get their own back on rivals by signing, decorating or daubing a device that appears at the Mets' baseball ground, Shea Stadium, whenever someone hits a home run.<br> The pair, who grow <b>on</b> you after a while, turn out to be confident losers, losing among other things a pair of expensive trainers and a bicycle. Most amusingly, they fail when planning what they think of <b>as</b> a major heist, ie a theft from a rich white girl with a taste for grass and literature. The film's strong suit is its use of locations.ComedyStreet<br> artPhilip Frenchguardian.co.uk<br> &copy; 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content <b>is</b> subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds Mike Trout homered and drove in three runs, and Erick Aybar's two-run shot gave Los Angeles the lead for good <b>as</b> the Angels beat Detroit 7-4 on Wednesday night for their eighth consecutive win <b>over</b> the Tigers.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> Clinkle, a new stealthy mobile payments start-up, has raised $25 million, hoping to succeed where so many other <b>efforts</b> have fizzled by <a href = "http://congmacom.aidpage.com/">inventing a</a> practical way to replace credit cards with smartphones.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Photos: M. Scott <b>Brauer</b> <b>“Fruitvale</b> Station,” based on the true story of a Bay Area black man shot by a white police officer on a subway platform, examines the subject <b>with</b> a steady, objective eye.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> Cuauhtémoc Blanco , a Chicago Fire standout who was named MVP of last week's MLS All-Star Game, will not be allowed to play in the U.S. Open Cup <b>for</b> at least two years <b>because</b> of his actions during a match against D.C. United this month, the U.S.<br> Soccer Federation ruled yesterday.<br> First came duct tape.<br> Then the airport liquid ban. And yesterday, officials unveiled the latest development in the country's war on terror: <b>an</b> American Idol-style contest for homeland security inventors. A quiet but beautiful show of classic Italian <b>cars</b> has taken place for the last 27 years in the Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; A 3D-printed gun capable of firing multiple rounds may be unveiled soon.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <b>The</b> British musical earned more than $1 million last week, joining “Motown” and “Kinky <b>Boots”</b> as new shows that are drawing substantial audiences.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> Rookie Jedd Gyorko hit a two-run <b>homer</b> with two outs in the sixth and Will Venable followed with a solo shot to help carry Edinson Volquez and the San <b>Diego</b> Padres to a 5-1 victory over the Arizona Diamondbacks on Sunday.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Angela Merkel dismisses call <b>to</b> overturn arms embargo, saying it could 'fan flames of conflict'The sudden Anglo-French move to overturn a European arms embargo on Syria in order to equip the rebels seeking to overthrow the Assad regime has run into a solid wall of resistance <b>at</b> an EU summit, with the German chancellor, Angela Merkel, dismissing the policy U-turn and others warning of a regional conflagration from which Iran would <b>emerge</b> the winner.Following<br> the summit, the prime minister toned down his enthusiasm for arming the Syrian opposition, saying that he wanted <b>the</b> arms embargo lifted but did not necessarily want <b>to</b> deliver arms to anti-regime forces two years into the civil war.David Cameron and the French president, François Hollande, had forced the issue on to the agenda of Friday's summit, on the second anniversary of the uprising.<br> Other participants, who were <b>not</b> <a href = "http://libriotheque.org/?q=node/1803">informed of</a> the abrupt policy shift, were stunned at the <b>attempt</b> to overturn EU decisions on <b>the</b> sanctions regime against Syria agreed only a fortnight ago.Catherine Ashton, Britain's EU commissioner in charge of foreign and security policy, knew nothing of <b>the</b> change until she read <b>about</b> it in the newspaper, according to senior sources, and responded to the Anglo-French initiative by laying out the "pros and cons" of a lifting of the ban. "There were not any pros," said an EU source.Merkel<br> said Ashton told the summit that lifting the embargo would trigger a regional arms race in Syria from which Iran could emerge as the real victor. The Austrian chancellor, Werner Faymann, bluntly opposed lifting the arms ban and warned that he would order the withdrawal of hundreds of Austrian UN forces from the disputed Golan Heights between Syria and Israel if the European consensus shifted.The Dutch foreign minister wrote to the Dutch parliament also criticising the Anglo-French move."We<br> have a number of concerns," said Merkel. "One has to ask if it does not fan the flames of the conflict."The<br> German leader has clearly been surprised by the swiftness of the Anglo-French change. EU foreign ministers met in Brussels last Monday, with the <b>UN</b> envoy on Syria, Lakhdar Brahimi, attending. Neither the British nor the French <b>raised</b> the demands for lifting the embargo then."Just the fact that two have changed their minds doesn't mean that the other 25 have to follow suit," said Merkel.Meanwhile, <b>in</b> Syria the head of the <b>main</b> rebel group pledged to fight until the "criminal" regime was gone.General Salim Idris, the head of the Supreme Military Council, called on Syrian soldiers to join the rebels in a "fight for freedom and <b>democracy"</b> in a video obtained by the Associated Press.Authorities in Damascus increased security for the anniversary, as rebels vowed to intensify attacks on government troops and state institutions.A fortnight <b>ago</b> EU foreign ministers loosened the embargo <b>terms</b> under British pressure to allowed the supply of more than "non-lethal" equipment to <b>the</b> forces fighting Bashar al-Assad. Last Tuesday, in response to a question in the House of Commons, Cameron talked for the first time of lifting the embargo.At Friday's summit he contested <b>arguments</b> <a href = "http://www.whyamisofatmovie.com/groups/30s-are-the-new-20s/forum/topic/sports-briefing-college-football-penn-state-coach-to-get-raise">that arms</a> supplies would go to the wrong people, saying "that is what has happened already" and <b>queried</b> whether arming the opposition would hamper the prospects of a political settlement. But he added: "I'm not saying that Britain would like to supply arms to rebel groups.<br> We want to work with them and make sure they're doing the right thing."International policy on Syria was not working, the prime <b>minister</b> added, dismissing the <b>objection</b> that Britain would be bound by EU decisions on sanctions. "If we want to take individual action we are <b>free</b> to do so," he said.The <b>arms</b> embargo treated both sides to the conflict equally and wrongly, the prime minister said. "Shouldn't we be sending a clear signal of difference?"The dispute is to <b>be</b> discussed by EU foreign ministers in Dublin next week, with London and Paris pushing for what will probably be an unobtainable consensus to change the EU embargo by May.The question <b>then</b> will be whether France <b>and</b> Britain ignore EU policies they are signed up to and go ahead with the supplies.<br> They ignored EU policy-makers over Libya two years ago and more recently in France's British-supported invasion of <b>Mali.SyriaEuropean</b> <b>UnionArab</b> <b>and</b> <b>Middle</b> East unrestForeign policyFranceAngela MerkelMiddle East and North AfricaGermanyEuropeIan Traynorguardian.co.uk <b>&copy;</b> 2013 <b>Guardian</b> News <b>and</b> Media Limited or its affiliated <b>companies.</b> All rights reserved.<br> | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds “The sounds uttered by birds offer in several respects the nearest analogy to language,” Charles Darwin wrote in “The Descent of Man” (1871), while <b>contemplating</b> how humans learned to speak. Language, he speculated, might have had its origins in singing, which “might have given rise to words expressive of various complex emotions.”<br> Now researchers from MIT, along with a <b>scholar</b> from the University of Tokyo, say that Darwin was on <b>the</b> right path. The balance of evidence, they believe, suggests that human language is a grafting of two communication forms found elsewhere in the animal kingdom: first, the elaborate songs of birds, and second, the more utilitarian, information-bearing types of expression seen <b>in</b> a diversity of other animals.“It’s this adventitious combination that triggered human language,” says Shigeru Miyagawa, a professor of linguistics <a href = "http://psngamertags.com/groups/running-shoes-nike-associated-to-articles/forum/topic/watch-list-original-pilots-judged-by-the-masses/?_wpnonce=790ae5ea99&font-size=smaller">in MIT’s</a> Department of Linguistics and Philosophy, and co-author of a new paper published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology.<br> The <b>idea</b> builds upon Miyagawa’s conclusion, detailed in his previous work, that there are two “layers” in all human languages: an <b>“expression”</b> layer, which involves the changeable organization of sentences, and a “lexical” layer, which relates to <b>the</b> core content of a sentence. His conclusion is based on earlier work by linguists including Noam Chomsky, Kenneth Hale and <b>Samuel</b> Jay Keyser.Based<br> on an analysis of animal communication, <b>and</b> using Miyagawa’s framework, the authors say that birdsong closely resembles the expression layer of human sentences — whereas <b>the</b> communicative waggles of <b>bees,</b> or the short, audible messages of primates, are more like the lexical layer. At some point, between 50,000 and 80,000 years ago, humans may have merged these two types of expression into a uniquely sophisticated form of language.“There were <b>these</b> two pre-existing systems,” Miyagawa says, “like apples and oranges that just happened to be put together.” These <b>kinds</b> of adaptations of existing structures are common in natural history, notes Robert Berwick, a co-author of the paper, who is a professor of computational linguistics in MIT's Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems, in the Department of Electrical Engineering <b>and</b> Computer Science.“When<br> something <b>new</b> <b>evolves,</b> it is <b>often</b> built out of old parts,” Berwick says.<br> “We see this over and over again in evolution.<br> Old structures can change just a <b>little</b> bit, and acquire radically new functions.”A new chapter in the songbookThe new paper, “The Emergence of Hierarchical Structure in Human Language,” was co-written by Miyagawa, Berwick and Kazuo Okanoya, a biopsychologist at the University of <b>Tokyo</b> who is an expert on animal communication.To consider the difference between the <b>expression</b> layer and the lexical layer, take a simple sentence: “Todd saw a condor.”<br> We can easily create variations of this, such as, “When did Todd see a condor?” This rearranging of elements takes place in the expression layer and allows us to add complexity and ask questions. <b>But</b> the lexical layer remains the <b>same,</b> since <b>it</b> involves <b>the</b> same core elements: the subject, “Todd,” the verb, “to see,” and the <b>object,</b> “condor.” Birdsong lacks <b>a</b> lexical structure.<br> Instead, birds <a href = "http://www.pegasusnews.com/users/abeswadte/">sing learned</a> melodies with what Berwick calls a “holistic” structure; the entire song has one meaning, whether about mating, territory or other things.<br> The Bengalese finch, as the authors note, can loop back to parts of previous melodies, allowing for greater variation and communication of more things; a nightingale may be able to recite from 100 to 200 different melodies. By contrast, other types of <b>animals</b> have bare-bones modes of expression without the same melodic capacity.<br> Bees communicate visually, using precise waggles to indicate sources of foods to their peers; other primates can make a range of sounds, comprising warnings about predators and other messages.Humans, according to Miyagawa, Berwick and Okanoya, <b>fruitfully</b> <b>combined</b> these systems. We can communicate essential information, like bees or primates — but like birds, we also have a melodic capacity and an ability to recombine parts of our uttered language.<br> For <b>this</b> reason, our finite vocabularies can generate a seemingly infinite string <b>of</b> words.<br> Indeed, the researchers suggest that humans first had the ability to sing, as Darwin conjectured, and then managed <b>to</b> integrate specific lexical elements into those songs.“It’s not a very long step to say that what got joined together was the ability to <b>construct</b> these complex patterns, like a song, but with words,” Berwick says. As they note in the paper, some of the “striking parallels” between language acquisition in birds and humans include the phase of life when each is best at picking up languages, and <b>the</b> part of the <b>brain</b> used for language. Another similarity, Berwick notes, <b>relates</b> to an insight of celebrated MIT professor emeritus of linguistics Morris Halle, who, as Berwick puts it, observed that “all human languages have a finite number of stress patterns, a certain number of beat patterns.<br> Well, in birdsong, there is also this limited number of beat patterns.” Birds and beesNorbert Hornstein, a professor of linguistics at the University <b>of</b> Maryland, <b>says</b> the paper has been “very well received” among linguists, and “perhaps will be the standard go-to paper for language-birdsong <b>comparison</b> for the <b>next</b> five years.”<br> Hornstein adds that he <b>would</b> like to <b>see</b> further comparison of birdsong and sound <b>production</b> in human language, as well as more neuroscientific research, pertaining <a href = "http://www.adult-board.com/index.php?do=/blog/11090/columnist-discusses-financial-literacy-at-swim-event/">to both</a> birds and humans, to see how brains are <b>structured</b> for making <b>sounds.The<br></b> researchers acknowledge that further empirical studies on the subject would be desirable.“It’s<br> just a hypothesis,” Berwick says. “But it’s a way to make explicit what Darwin was talking about very <b>vaguely,</b> because we know more about language now.”Miyagawa,<br> for his part, asserts it is a viable idea in part because it could be subject to more scrutiny, as the communication patterns of other species are examined <b>in</b> further detail. “If this is right, then human language has a precursor <b>in</b> nature, in evolution, that we can actually test today,” he says, adding that bees, birds and other primates could <b>all</b> be sources of further research insight.MIT-based research in linguistics has largely been characterized by the search for universal aspects of all human languages. With this paper, <b>Miyagawa,</b> Berwick and Okanoya hope to spur others to think of the <b>universality</b> of language in evolutionary terms. It <b>is</b> not just a random cultural construct, <b>they</b> say, but based in part on capacities humans share with other species.<br> At the same time, Miyagawa notes, human language <b>is</b> unique, in that two independent systems <b>in</b> nature merged, in our species, to allow us to generate unbounded linguistic possibilities, albeit within a constrained system.“Human language is not <b>just</b> freeform, but it is rule-based,” Miyagawa says.<br> “If we are right, human language has a very heavy constraint on what it can and cannot do, based on its antecedents <b>in</b> nature.”<br> Paul Pierce had 18 points and 11 rebounds, and Avery Bradley scored 22 points to lead the Boston Celtics to a 109-101 win over <b>the</b> Philadelphia 76ers on Wednesday night.<br> KABUL - An Afghan government probe <b>of</b> private security companies has accused 16 firms of violations that include employing too many guards, failing to pay taxes for up to two years, and keeping unregistered weapons and armored vehicles. President <b>Robert</b> Mugabe said Friday that his ZANU-PF party will have to fight hard to win elections scheduled for July 31.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> Congress has moved to reassert its <b>role</b> as a check on the nation's most sensitive spy programs after having been marginalized for years in the management of covert intelligence
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hyarissent posted on Nov 18th 2013 ...

<b>Many</b> industrial plants depend on water vapor condensing on metal plates: In power plants, the resulting water is then returned to a boiler to be vaporized again; in desalination plants, it yields a supply of clean water. The efficiency of such plants depends crucially on how easily droplets of water can form on these metal plates, or condensers, and how easily they fall away, leaving room for more droplets to form. The key to improving the efficiency of such plants is to increase the condensers’ heat-transfer coefficient — a <b>measure</b> of how readily heat can be transferred away from those surfaces, explains Nenad Miljkovic, a doctoral student in mechanical engineering at MIT.<br> As part of his thesis research, he and colleagues have done just that: designing, making and testing a coated surface with nanostructured patterns that greatly increase the heat-transfer coefficient.The results of that work have been published in the <b>journal</b> Nano Letters, <b>in</b> a paper co-authored by Miljkovic, mechanical <b>engineering</b> associate professor Evelyn Wang, and five other researchers from the Device Research Lab (DRL) in MIT’s mechanical engineering department.On a typical, flat-plate condenser, water vapor condenses to form a liquid film on the surface, drastically reducing the condenser’s ability to collect more water until gravity drains the film. “It acts as a barrier to heat transfer,” Miljkovic says.<br> He and other researchers have focused on ways of encouraging water to bead up into droplets that then fall away from the surface, allowing more rapid water <b>removal.“The</b> way to remove the thermal barrier is to remove [the droplets] as quickly as possible,” he says. Many researchers have studied ways of doing this by creating hydrophobic surfaces, either through chemical treatment or through surface patterning.<br> But Miljkovic and his colleagues have now taken this a step <b>further</b> by making scalable surfaces with nanoscale features that barely touch the droplets.<br> <b>The</b> result: Droplets don’t <b>just</b> fall from the surface, but actually jump away from it, increasing the efficiency of the process.<br> The energy released as tiny droplets merge to form larger ones is enough to propel the droplets upward from the surface, meaning the removal of droplets doesn’t depend solely on gravity. An easy interface then presents users with the bottom-line data they need to know: how much a solar conversion would cost, and how long, given current <b>levels</b> of energy use, that investment would take to pay <b>off.<br></b> This particular tool, and others Reinhart and his students are developing for commercial enterprises, all feature interfaces that make financial costs and benefits easy to access.“In theory, there is a lot of money lying around that people <b>would</b> like to invest in green buildings,” Reinhart says.<br> “But there <b>is</b> a lot of doubt that you get your money back.<br> So we <b>find</b> that this kind of analysis is very welcome.”Ultimately, Reinhart’s research, and projects such as the Cambridge Solar Map, have multiple audiences.<br> Planners, developers and engineers can benefit from knowing more about daylight — but so can architects, by incorporating empirical light models into their <b>designs.<br></b> Reinhart thinks the architecture profession — and, ultimately, building occupants — will benefit from this kind of convergence.<br> “I love design,” Reinhart says, adding: “I think the most relevant <b>research</b> in building science, in this domain, <b>has</b> to be done in a <a href = "http://weewar.com/user/mirisearch/favoredMaps">school of</a> architecture. Because the classroom is the lab … the <b>architecture</b> students come with wider <b>questions</b> [about using your own research]. That’s <b>the</b> best thing that can happen to you.”President Obama's proposed fiscal 2012 budget protects many District programs from <b>the</b> federal budget ax, but Republicans are threatening to cut spending in some of the areas - including Metro, the courts and school improvements, local officials said Monday.<br> U.S. Assistant Secretary of State William Brownfield says the amount of illegal drugs entering the United States from the Caribbean has risen, a sign drug cartels are looking for new routes as Mexico and Central American boost anti-drug enforcement.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> At an emotional news conference, Anzor and Zubeidat Tsarnaev made accusations of a conspiracy theory and refused to accept the possibility that their children committed a bombing.<br> Students next to a researcher talking on her cellphone had more <b>trouble</b> solving puzzles than those within earshot of two people <b>talking</b> in the same room. Parents, in an attempt to keep their children safe, access social media, <b>but</b> at the end of the day, is it really too much information?&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Qantas Airlines revamped the uniform for its flight attendants the way any self-respecting carrier does these days: <b>it</b> enlisted a <b>Paris-based</b> designer and showcased the collection using a supermodel in a fashion show.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Hats off, please, to Mat Johnson, author of this wonderful, black-humored novel - part social satire, part meditation on race in America, part metafiction <b>and,</b> just as important, a rollicking fantasy adventure. "Pym" <b>is</b> outrageously entertaining, a book that brilliantly re-imagines and extends Ed... -- MONDAY, March 14 TOKYO - Bank of England Gov. Mervyn King speaks in Tokyo. Improvements in prison life for Amir Hekmati, incarcerated for nearly two years on spying accusations, strengthened his family’s hope that <b>Iran’s</b> judiciary would favorably review an appeal for his release.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Medical care is intended to help patients, not enrich providers. But the <b>way</b> prices are rising, it’s beginning to <b>look</b> less like help than like highway robbery.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; "This isn't <b>about</b> saying, 'School's out, away you go kids.' This is about <b>going</b> to a technical college, doing a couple of days <b>a</b> week on a vocational course and going into a business or indeed a <b>public</b> sector employer and getting <b>the</b> link in <b>their</b> mind, <b>in</b> their DNA, that if you get better skilled, you make more money," he adds. <b>With</b> the <b>most</b> recent issue of its news digest PLAN, the School of Architecture <b>+</b> Planning is introducing the option of reading its news on the go, using your smartphone and/or digital tablet.<br> The mobile app, developed by SMArchS candidate Laia Mogas-Soldevila and Jorge Duro-Royo, partners in Dumo Lab*, will resize and adapt the content and layout automatically to suit the device you're using. You have the choice to browse high-res PDFs of the paper format or you can view all the stories in reconfigured HTML format, which allows you to filter the stories by issue number and/or division (Architecture, Planning, Media Lab, Real Estate, ACT or SA+P). In both cases, you can zoom <b>in</b> for <b>greater</b> image detail and larger font size <b>and</b> follow interactive links to further information. The HTML format also <b>features</b> mobile-friendly slideshows of every story's <b>related</b> images and the capability to move from <a href = "http://italianinutah.com/communityserver/members/acenas.aspx">one story</a> to another with a simple swipe of the finger. Both the PDF and HTML formats feature easy access to the MIT and SA+P websites and to their online collections of videos. You can download the mobile app from the SA+P website or from the Apple App Store.<br> Find out more The death toll in the vacation town where runaway railroad tank cars filled with oil derailed and exploded on Saturday grew to 13.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; This week, a feast at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden <b>for</b> the Japanese cherry blossom festival, English <b>pork</b> pies and pricey ice cream from Connecticut cows.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> This project <b>is</b> unique, Buyukozturk says, in that these core research areas are addressed under the same umbrella <b>and</b> studied in parallel, for the first time taking into consideration the interaction between them.“This is an exciting time for research and innovation in built environment sustainability when the world’s physical infrastructure is deteriorating and energy resources are becoming scarce," Buyukozturk says.<br> "Material innovations and creative structural system applications implementing durability, energy <b>efficiency,</b> and better life-cycle performance, combined with advanced <b>sensor</b> and monitoring technologies, are at the heart of this <b>leadership</b> effort with the objective to establish a science-based new paradigm in engineering design that can be used in Kuwait and the general Gulf region and <b>exported</b> throughout the world."The CNRE — directed by Mujid Kazimi alongside associate director Jacopo Buongiorno, both of the Department of the Nuclear Science and Engineering — has recently initiated funding of several <b>exploratory</b> research <b>projects</b> at the seed <b>level,</b> and funding at the signature level for integrated large-scale research projects.“This<br> signature project is a unique opportunity to generate transformative and scalable technological solutions to a <b>sustainable</b> and energy efficient buildings for Kuwait and The Gulf states in general. With a number of mega projects being planned in <b>that</b> <b>region</b> of the world, the studies being addressed, <b>therefore,</b> <b>cannot</b> be more timely.<br> Our efforts at the center are on-going to initiate more collaborative projects to tackle critical energy and environment related <b>issues.”<br></b> says Murad Abu-Khalaf, the executive director of CNRE.<br> As convening collaborators, the MIT-IPC — a multidisciplinary research center focused on innovation, productivity and competitiveness — and AEE, a national business association representing the advanced <b>energy</b> industry, believe that an effort to remove barriers to advanced energy adoption must take place at both the state and federal <b>levels.<br></b> Various regions are innovating successfully today within the power <b>sector.</b> The forum provides an opportunity to share and build upon these successes and discuss future opportunities.<br> The Executive Forum collaboration is led by <b>AEE</b> co-founder and co-chair Hemant Taneja, a managing director of General Catalyst <b>Partners;</b> and Richard Lester, the Japan Steel Industry Professor and head of MIT’s Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering and the faculty director of the MIT-IPC.“Advanced Energy Economy is proud to join with the IPC to draw attention to the potential for transforming America’s economy <b>through</b> advanced <b>energy</b> technologies,” said Hemant <b>Taneja.</b> “Advanced <b>energy</b> companies are creating economic value today and will create <b>even</b> more if <b>we</b> make the most of local resources. These forums will forge public-private partnerships to leverage the assets of each region for faster adoption of new technologies and faster growth of the companies that produce them.” “This Forum Series is <b>part</b> of a broad-based <a href = "http://gprasad.net/blogs/200754">effort to</a> envision a more innovative power <b>sector</b> for the country. The electric power industry is on <b>the</b> front lines of America’s energy innovation challenge, <b>and</b> by engaging the leaders of innovative energy companies with executives of companies that could adopt their <b>innovations,</b> we believe we can create a road map toward that future,” says Lester, who is renowned for his work on energy and innovation. “By joining together on neutral ground, we can start a dialogue <b>that</b> leads to a more innovative energy sector in the country, <b>faster</b> growth for local and regional economies, and — crucially — a more effective response to the challenge of climate change.” AEE and the MIT-IPC are co-organizing the series of regional events.<br> The AEE/MIT Executive Forums will examine key challenges to advanced energy market adoption, focusing on topics of local relevance at each event.<br> Forum locations under consideration for future events include San Francisco, Houston and other regional advanced energy centers. Each forum will build on the previous discussions in the series and actions/partnerships will be formed to implement the recommendations and further guide AEE and MIT-IPC initiatives around research, policy advocacy, capital innovation, and business-to-business engagement to accelerate advanced energy market adoption.<br> "The AEE/MIT-IPC <b>Executive</b> Forum Series <b>is</b> constructive because it represents <b>a</b> frank and open dialogue in the effort to facilitate regional economic growth <b>and</b> reliable electric service through energy technology innovation," says Randy Mehrberg, president, PSEG Energy Holdings  "I particularly appreciate the constructive tone directed toward mutually beneficial solutions, with a focus <b>on</b> improved systems, advanced technologies, a cleaner environment, and our customers.<br> This dialogue will prove valuable in helping to make America's energy economy more dynamic in the years ahead." Jaime Garcia put the Brewers and St.<br> Louis' sweep of Milwaukee under wraps.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> NEW <b>YORK</b> -- Fixed mortgage rates edged up this week, but even 30-year rates below 5 percent have done little to boost home sales. <b></b> Four MIT professors have been named 2013 MacVicar Faculty Fellows for their outstanding undergraduate teaching, mentoring and educational innovation. This year’s <b>honorees</b> are Linda Griffith, the School of Engineering Teaching Innovation Professor of Biological <b>and</b> Mechanical Engineering; Rob Miller, an associate professor of computer science and engineering; <b>Laura</b> Schulz, the Class of 1943 Career Development Associate Professor of Cognitive Science; and Emma Teng, an associate professor of China studies and the T.T. and Wei Fong Chao Professor of Asian Civilizations.These<br> professors bring to 45 the number of current MacVicar Faculty Fellows, part of a program established in 1992 to honor the life and devotion to teaching excellence of Margaret MacVicar ‘64, ScD ‘67, MIT’s first dean for <b>undergraduate</b> education and founder of the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP). The 10-year fellowship provides an annual allowance in support of undergraduate teaching.Provost Chris A. Kaiser selected the fellows in conjunction with an advisory committee of faculty and <b>students</b> chaired by Daniel Hastings, dean for undergraduate education.To celebrate undergraduate education <b>on</b> this MacVicar Day, the Institute will host a symposium this afternoon featuring five MIT faculty members speaking on “Reimagining the MIT Classroom: Experiments with Digital Learning.”<br> Hastings will introduce the new MacVicar Fellows and then <b>moderate</b> the symposium.<br> Speakers <b>will</b> include Teng; Jesus del Alamo, the Donner Professor of Science in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer <a href = "http://myexperiment.elda.org/groups/37">Science; Anette</a> Hosoi, an associate professor of mechanical engineering and applied mathematics; Anne E.<br> C.<br> <b>McCants,</b> a professor of history; and Troy Van Voorhis, a professor of chemistry.<br> Today’s program will run from 2 to 4 p.m. <b>in</b> Bartos Theater (E15-070). A reception <b>honoring</b> the new MacVicar Fellows will follow from 4 to 5 <b>p.m.<br></b> in Bartos Lobby. The symposium and reception are open to the <b>entire</b> MIT community.Linda<br> GriffithLinda Griffith received her BS in chemical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1982, and her PhD in chemical engineering from the University of California at Berkeley in 1988.<br> She <b>was</b> a postdoc in MIT’s Department of Chemical Engineering from 1988 to 1990, becoming an assistant professor in that department in 1991, an associate professor in 1996, and a full professor in 2002.<br> Griffith joined the faculty of the Department of Biological Engineering in 1998, and the faculty of the Department of Mechanical Engineering in 2003.Students view Griffith as a “rockstar” and a “dynamic force”; a colleague described her lectures as “extraordinary, flawlessly moving from engineering calculations to cell biology to medicine.”<br> “She entered the classroom each day a blur of energy and enthusiasm … ready to <b>fill</b> chalkboard after chalkboard with equations, stopping only to entertain us with colorful anecdotes,” one student <b>wrote.</b> “No matter how complex the topic, Linda made it look easy and interesting.” “She would often ask us <b>questions</b> in class,” another student added, “and where possible, she would weave in the impact of what we do.<br> … For me personally, making the relationship between core engineering principles and the impact that engineers could — and should — have on society was paramount.”Griffith and Miller are among the Institute’s most dedicated researchers and educators, says Ian A. Waitz, dean of the School <b>of</b> Engineering and a MacVicar Faculty Fellow. “Along with Linda’s remarkable research in biological and tissue engineering,” Waitz says, “she was a driving force behind the creation of MIT’s newest undergraduate major, biological engineering, which has served as a model for similar curricula around <b>the</b> world.<br> Working with colleagues from across the Institute, she oversaw the creation of nine new subjects for the major, <b>creating</b> two of them herself from scratch. And while working toward the broad impacts that come with such innovations, Linda has throughout her career <b>remained</b> a trusted and dedicated advisor and advocate to her many students.”  Rob MillerRob Miller received his SB and MEng from MIT <b>in</b> 1995, and his PhD from Carnegie Mellon University in 2002. He joined MIT as an assistant professor in 2002, <b>becoming</b> an associate professor in 2006.One colleague described Miller as “a fabulous teacher in all respects: in course development, in course management and organization, in hands-on pedagogy and engagement with students, and in inventing new ways to use technology to enhance education.”Another wrote: “I think Rob embodies the ideal of an MIT teacher — caring, engaging, tirelessly <b>working</b> on behalf of <b>the</b> students, eliciting <b>respect,</b> admiration, and joy from the students.”Students<br> in Miller’s courses agree that his lectures are exceptional.“In my six years at MIT,” one wrote, “Rob’s course was the only one whose lectures I felt could not be <b>missed.<br></b> I was absent for exactly one lecture due to travel for a job interview, and I still remember <a href = "http://www.indianablackexpo.biz/the-black-expo/even-bruno-believes-holidays-0">how genuinely</a> disappointed I felt … his lectures always prompted such interesting discussion and the material was presented so well, I felt as though I had missed something.”“Rob’s<br> research projects — including a revolutionary <b>crowd-based</b> system for text <b>editing</b> and programming-code evaluation — may also have significant educational applications, with the potential to impact the lives and learning of students around the world as they are implemented on MITx,” Waitz says. “Similarly, the course he developed on <b>user</b> interface and design has been extremely successful with an entire generation of students who are <b>now</b> in industry shaping our interactive experiences on a daily basis.” Laura SchulzLaura Schulz earned a BA in philosophy from the University of Michigan in 1992, and an MA and PhD, both in developmental psychology from the University of California at Berkeley, in 2002 and 2004, respectively. She joined MIT as an assistant professor in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Science in 2005, becoming an associate professor in 2010.Schulz’s colleagues call her “a brilliant, passionate, innovative and enthusiastic <b>teacher”</b> and “a caring and committed educator who is deeply engaged in <b>undergraduate</b> education at all levels.”“She knows her <b>undergraduates</b> well, has them over to her house and welcomes them warmly into her life, meets with them about their work and takes them seriously as junior colleagues and human beings,” one wrote.<br> “She has more undergraduate office hours than anyone else I know, and is regularly <b>meeting</b> with undergraduates outside her normally scheduled hours … she sets the highest example for MIT undergraduates on how to <b>be</b> a scientist, an educator and a person who is deeply committed to helping <b>others</b> develop themselves and their potential.”“Dr. Schulz was undoubtedly the one professor who made the most lasting impact on my <b>life,”</b> one student wrote. “I felt like Dr.<br> Schulz became one of my greatest mentors, supporters and advocates. We discussed my interests and goals, and together figured out a plan to help me get there.”Marc Kastner, dean of the School of Science, cites Schulz’s teaching of 9.85 <b>(Early</b> Childhood Cognition), a key part of the undergraduate curriculum in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Science (BCS), as an example of her devotion to students. “Her high expectations for students in this Communication Intensive (CI-M) <b>course</b> and her dedication to excellence in teaching have provided essential training in critical writing and analysis for BCS undergraduates,” <b>Kastner</b> says. “As of last spring, she had mentored an astounding 68 UROP <b>[Undergraduate</b> Research Opportunities Program] students, who were able to participate in her groundbreaking research into how children learn.”Emma<br> TengEmma Teng holds three degrees from Harvard University: an AB, received in 1989; an AM, received in 1992, and a PhD, received in 1997.<br> She became an assistant professor in MIT’s Foreign Languages and Literatures section in 1998, and an associate <b>professor</b> in 2002.<br> In 2012, she began a second appointment in the Institute’s History section.Teng’s<br> students describe <b>her</b> <b>as</b> “simultaneously … an instructor, a mentor, and a <b>confidante.”“I</b> know of no other faculty member who appears always to be with a <b>student</b> — in her office, in the copying room, or just walking down the hallway,” one colleague wrote. “Professor Teng attracts students like a magnet. <b>She</b> is a mentor to many formally, and to many more informally.”<br> <a href = "http://www.dicetroll.com/SMF/index.php?PHPSESSID=plebotglmqjlh02sj6p7kjl8e5&action=profile;u=18124">“Emma is</a> <b>a</b> brilliant scholar whose energy, enthusiasm and talent for bringing scholars together <b>enables</b> her to inspire students and faculty to move beyond what is usually expected,” another colleague observed.<br> “Her <b>creativity</b> gives others a model of how to think across disciplines, and her high standards keep us rigorous in our efforts.”<br> “Emma Teng embodies the best combination of qualities — top-notch research on Asian and Asian-American identities and histories with hands-on, deeply effective teaching and mentoring of students,” says Deborah <b>K.<br></b> Fitzgerald, Kenan Sahin Dean of the School of Humanities, Arts, and <b>Social</b> <b>Sciences.</b> “Whether <b>in</b> History, Foreign Languages and Literatures, or Women’s and Gender Studies, Emma puts it all together for MIT students. Her dedication to students and impact in the field make her an excellent MacVicar Fellow.” Lenders <b>have</b> become even less willing to part with their money, further crimping budgets and family spending. By contrast, Holladay’s algorithm in some sense inverts the ordinary motion-planning task. Rather <b>than</b> identifying paths that avoid collisions and adhering to them, it identifies paths that introduce collisions <b>and</b> seals them off. If the robot is using <b>one</b> hand to set down an object that’s prone to tipping over, for instance, <b>“I</b> might look for <b>a</b> place for the other hand that will block bad paths and kind of <b>funnel</b> <b>the</b> object into the path that I want,” Holladay says.Like Barry, Holladay had to find a simple method of representing the physical properties of the <b>object</b> the robot is manipulating. In addition to the placement <b>of</b> tall, tippy objects, her algorithm can also handle <b>cases</b> in which the robot is setting an object on a table, but the object sticks to the rubber sheath of the robot’s gripper. With Holladay’s algorithm, the robot can use its free gripper to prevent the object from sliding as it <b>withdraws</b> the other gripper.Independent learningBoth Barry and Holladay allow modification of their algorithms, through application programming interfaces that would allow other researchers to plug in parameters describing the physical behavior of new types of objects.<br> But the ultimate goal is for the robot <b>itself</b> to infer the relevant properties of objects by lifting, shoving, or otherwise manipulating them.Nor<br> are the researchers concerned that hardware improvements will render their algorithmic research obsolete. “The thought is that we’re unlikely to get hands <b>that</b> are as <b>flexible</b> and dexterous as human hands, and even if we did, it would be hard to figure out the AI and <b>planning</b> for those,” Barry says. “So we’ll always have to think about interesting ways to grasp <b>things.”“You<br></b> see a lot of demos where a robot might do something like slide plates, but it’s usually hard-coded for the <b>demo:</b> The robot knows <b>that</b> at this point, it needs to do this action for this particular thing,” says Kaijen Hsiao, a <b>research</b> scientist <b>and</b> manager at Willow Garage, <b>the</b> <b>company</b> that manufactures the PR2.<br> Barry and Holladay’s research, by <b>contrast,</b> is “a framework for incorporating behaviors like that as a more general motion-planning problem,” she says.<br> “Which is a very difficult thing, because it’s very high-dimensional. I think it’s really important <b>research,</b> and it’s very novel.” The inaugural Nora Ephron Prize, a <b>$25,000</b> award for a female filmmaker in the Tribeca festival, is <b>given</b> to Meera Menon, the director of “Farah Goes
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hostteenhy posted on Nov 2nd 2013 ...

Phallic fossil worms shed light on vertebrate evolution The baseball tradition of keeping a scorecard is facing increasing competition from ballpark attractions <b>and</b> hand-held electronic devices, but it has persevered.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Experts say 'endless lists of spellings, facts and rules' will not help develop children's ability to think or solve problemsA group of academics have warned that Michael <b>Gove's</b> national curriculum proposal will severely erode educational <b>standards</b> by "dumbing down" teaching and learning.In<br> a letter published in the Telegraph and Independent on Wednesday, 100 experts say the <b>education</b> <b>secretary's</b> new curriculum consists of "endless lists of spellings, facts and rules" that will not help to develop children's ability<br><img src="http://lh6.ggpht.com/_dlkAw43cLC0/SY_dejQkbHI/AAAAAAAADHY/8OKtsVeIWrA/s800/14-Lovely-Hearts-for-St-Valentines-day-jump.jpg"><br> to think <b>or</b> solve problems.Children,<br> they say, will be forced to learn "mountains of detail" for <b>English,</b> maths and science without understanding it.The<br> group, <b>which</b> includes professors from Nottingham Trent University, Leeds Metropolitan University, Oxford University and<br><img src="http://images2.fanpop.com/image/photos/9000000/Lovely-Baby-Girl-sweety-babies-9050432-450-344.jpg"><br> Bristol University, say the plans also betray a serious distrust of <b>teachers.The</b> <b>letter</b> says: "Much of [the proposed <b>curriculum]</b> demands too much too young. This will put pressure on teachers to rely on rote learning without understanding."Inappropriate demands will lead to failure and demoralisation."This curriculum betrays a serious distrust of teachers, in <b>its</b> amount of detailed instructions, and the education secretary has repeatedly ignored expert advice."The<br> academics urge teachers and parents to respond to the consultation, due to end in <b>April,</b> calling for a<br><img src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-35wQMpYtNZc/TXWNx8y2xCI/AAAAAAAB_2o/9vZYNfWrGn8/s1600/funny_demotivational_posters_01.jpg"><br> fresh start.The new draft curriculum contains plans <b>for</b> pupils to memorise their <b>times</b> tables up to 12 by age nine, multiply <b>and</b> <b>divide</b> fractions by age 11 as well as learn topics such as geometry, long division and multiplication and decimals.In<br> comes <b>in</b> the same week that two teaching unions announced a series of strikes starting this summer in a continuing row over pay, pensions and workload.Schools across the country are likely to be affected by the rolling programme of walkouts, along with a national strike <b>before</b> Christmas.The <a href = "http://zed15.tumblr.com/directory-of-ezines">directory of ezines </a> by England's two biggest teaching unions, the National Union of <b>Teachers</b> and the NASUWT, is an escalation of a continuing dispute with the government.Michael GoveCurriculumsSchoolsTeachingguardian.co.uk<br> &copy; 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its<br><img src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-jH7q2q3325c/TWB5ygWQeYI/AAAAAAAAA5w/IsFGDgK_Kcc/s1600/dog1.jpg"><br> affiliated companies. <b>All</b> rights reserved.<br> | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions <b>|</b> More Feeds <b>The</b> books from the actor, written with a co-author, will be aimed at middle-grade students and published by Random House.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> In the Brahmaputra River system, planners face a Hobson’s choice between the twin goals of climate change adaptation and mitigation.<br> PC Victoria Dixon tells court she found a sword, hammers, a metal spike, gaffer tape <b>and</b> black bags in accused men's carA police <b>officer</b> told a jury at Exeter crown court how she arrested two men accused of plotting to kill the soul singer <b>Joss</b> Stone after local people raised the alarm in June 2011.PC Victoria Dixon said <b>she</b> <b>was</b> the first officer to arrive at the <b>scene</b> in <b>the</b> Devon town of Cullompton, where she found a samurai sword in the<br><img src="http://lisagawlas.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/rose-love.jpg"><br> <b>boot</b> of the men's battered <b>Fiat</b> Punto, along with two hammers, a metal spike, gaffer tape and black bags.She<br> also recovered a printout of a map of Devon, where the singer lives, <b>that</b> included the words:<br><img src="http://cdn.motinetwork.net/motifake.com/image/demotivational-poster/0809/hilarious-hilarious-air-guitar-idiot-retard-cat-demotivational-poster-1220603476.jpg"><br> "Here Joss Stone."The<br> <b>jury</b> was shown the sword and other items.When Dixon asked the men what they were doing, one – Junior Bradshaw – said they had got lost while visiting a friend and were trying to <b>find</b> their way back to the motorway.The<br> prosecution alleges that Bradshaw, 32, and Kevin Liverpool, 35, <b>conspired</b> to rob and murder the 25-year-old singer. The men deny <b>both</b> charges and an allegation of conspiring to cause Stone grievous bodily harm.Notes<br> found by the police allegedly suggest the two, who lived together in Manchester, planned to decapitate Stone – whom they called a "she-devil" – <a href = "http://zed15.tumblr.com/forex-growth-bot">forex growth bot </a> her body in a river.The<br> prosecution has said their motive could have been financial but another note hinted they<br><img src="http://api.ning.com/files/sLvh4KvKMEeVZ39CoHj6WM5TTcg6t4zaCDZlwEu6oV5T7lkzbPh22cS-*0RMsNFnDVQyEQS1d3saH8JfSRh07HQ7esWLFNKh/Barney.jpg"><br> might have had <b>a</b> grudge against Stone because she <b>had</b> sung for the royal family and had been invited to Prince <b>William's</b> wedding.The<br> jury also heard from psychiatric nurse Albert Hoogland, <b>who</b> said Bradshaw had been released <b>from</b> Manchester Royal Infirmary 14 months before the alleged plot.He said care workers thought it was not appropriate for <b>him</b> to move in with Liverpool – whom he referred to as his "cousin" though they are not related.Hoogland said Bradshaw may have stopped taking his anti-psychotic medication but he saw him while he was living at the flat and did not consider his condition to have relapsed.The trial continues.CrimeSteven<br> Morrisguardian.co.uk &copy; 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds A <b>piece</b> of limestone, worn around the neck, symbolizes what generations endured.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; MIT senior <b>Holden</b> Lee has been awarded a 2013 <b>Gates</b> Cambridge Scholarship to pursue graduate studies in mathematics at the University of <b>Cambridge.<br></b> The prestigious Gates Cambridge Scholarships were established in 2000 through a donation from the Bill and Melinda <b>Gates</b> Foundation to cover the costs of <b>graduate</b> education at Cambridge for 90 students from around the world — 40 of them from the United States — each year. Lee will <b>start</b> a master’s program in pure mathematics at Cambridge this fall.Lee’s primary interest is in number theory.<br> After completing his master’s at Cambridge, he plans <b>to</b> acquire a PhD so that he <b>can</b> teach and conduct further research in this field. At MIT, Lee has served as vice president of the Undergraduate Math Association, worked as a teaching assistant in a mathematics summer program for high school students, and developed mathematical curricula and <b>online-learning</b> resources. <a href = "http://zed15.tumblr.com/natural-vitiligo-treatment">natural vitiligo treatment </a> the Asa Griggs Candler Professor of Mathematics <b>at</b><br><img src="http://image.shutterstock.com/display_pic_with_logo/74090/74090,1210689189,1/stock-photo-lovely-coffee-12542989.jpg"><br> Emory University, praised Lee’s undergraduate research experience contributions at Emory in summer 2011, highlighting in particular a paper Lee co-authored on p-adic modular forms.  Sug Woo Shin, <b>an</b> assistant professor of<br><img src="http://files.sharenator.com/777-s500x400-28766-580.gif"><br> mathematics at MIT, and Lee’s advisor in the <b>mathematics</b> department, observed, “Holden grasps new mathematical notions<br><img src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-35wQMpYtNZc/TXWNx8y2xCI/AAAAAAAB_2o/9vZYNfWrGn8/s1600/funny_demotivational_posters_01.jpg"><br> <b>quickly</b> and has insatiable thirst for discovering <b>beautiful</b> symmetries <b>hidden</b> in number theory.” Shin <b>also</b> commended Lee’s work teaching high school students and writing lessons on math that are free and available to the public. “Holden is greatly concerned with math education,” Shin <b>wrote,</b> and has a great desire “to share his knowledge.”Lee<br> is the second MIT student to have won a Gates Scholarship this year, joining Daniel D.<br> Jimenez BSc <b>’10,</b> <b>MEng</b> ’11, who will <b>enroll</b> in an MPhil in engineering for sustainable development at Cambridge in October. Students interested in the Gates Scholarship <b>should</b> speak with Kimberly Benard in MIT Global Education and Career Development.<br> The blueprint would change the city’s building codes to <b>promote</b> energy efficiency, and it calls for installing huge solar panels at municipal properties and building alternative fueling stations. Fueled by signs of improvement in the labor market, stocks marched into record territory Friday, continuing a year-long rise that has defied expectations. The latest rally was kicked off by government data showing the economy added 165,000 jobs last month <b>—</b> far more than analysts expected. Read full article<br><img src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-jH7q2q3325c/TWB5ygWQeYI/AAAAAAAAA5w/IsFGDgK_Kcc/s1600/dog1.jpg"><br> &#62;&#62;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The Vatican said <b>the</b> “anti-clerical left”<br><img src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-1l7nTjswX6I/UHpZxoNyF4I/AAAAAAAABgg/avGce2Ei-c8/s1600/I%2Bmiss%2Byou%2Bsayings%2Btouchy%2Bn66.jpg"><br> was behind accusations<br><img src="http://hqwalls.org/walls/lovely_puppy_wallpaper_2-normal.jpg"><br> that Pope Francis failed to do enough about abuses in Argentina’s so-called Dirty War.<br> Cristiano Ronaldo has celebrated dozens of goals at Old Trafford but Tuesday's winner for Real Madrid against Manchester United was the first time he held up his hands in apology after scoring. If there’s one type of fur you need next season, it’s beaver. Now researchers in MIT’s Department of <a href = "http://zed15.tumblr.com/Pregnancy-Miracle">Pregnancy Miracle </a> and Planetary <b>Sciences</b> (EAPS) have tested this theory by studying the relationship between precipitation and erosion on the Hawaiian island of Kauai, which has one of the world’s steepest gradients in annual rainfall. The center of the island receives more than 9 meters (about 350 inches) of rain per year, while its shores remain relatively <b>dry,</b> with as little as half a meter (about 20 inches) of rainfall annually.<br> The researchers charted the island’s precipitation and estimated how much land has eroded over Kauai’s 4-million-year history. They found a clear pattern: The more rain a region receives, the more efficiently its rivers cut into rock, forming deep canyons in the wettest areas.<br> The group used these measurements to test a widely used but rarely tested mathematical formula for erosion, and found that when they factored<br><img src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_JnfwCALOmPk/S7wIU7GtdZI/AAAAAAAACko/98wWaKxKpEk/s400/pw%2B2"><br> precipitation rates into the equation, they could accurately predict how rivers carved out the island over time. “We now have empirical support for an idea <b>that</b> has been around for a <b>while,”</b> says Ken Ferrier, <b>who</b> led the study while a postdoc at MIT and <b>is</b> now <b>a</b> postdoc at Harvard University.<br> “That idea is that precipitation really should affect how quickly rivers cut through rock,<br><img src="http://blog-photos.dogvacay.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/The-aggressive-dog-with-humans.jpg"><br> which has many implications for how landscapes evolve.”Ferrier published the results of the study this week in the journal Nature. The study’s co-authors are MIT graduate student Kimberly <b>Huppert</b> and Taylor Perron, the Cecil and Ida Green Assistant Professor of Geology in EAPS.<br> Rain versus the volcanoAccording to the researchers, Kauai’s steep rainfall gradient and uniform volcanic rock make it an “exceptional natural laboratory” for testing the <b>relationship</b> between precipitation and erosion.<br> Wind patterns sweep rain clouds<br><img src="http://dezignus.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/15lovely-heart-vector1.jpg"><br> from the ocean toward the peak of the island’s volcano, where they rain out most of their moisture before passing over the rest of the <b>island.</b> As a result, annual rainfall is highest in the <a href = "http://zed15.tumblr.com/vision-without-glasses">vision without glasses </a> with a dramatic drop-off toward the coasts, and <b>is</b> also higher on the side of the island that faces the wind.<br> If rainfall indeed has an effect on erosion, the team reasoned, then the island’s erosion rates should exhibit a similarly dramatic <b>pattern.</b> To test their theory, the researchers first looked at Kauai’s current topography, which features large canyons funneling into the middle of the island, with smaller valleys on the outskirts. They then created a map of <b>what</b> the island looked like when it first formed more than 4 million years ago, before erosion altered its surface. <b>To</b> do that, the researchers identified gently sloping, nearly planar surfaces around the island <b>that</b> likely are remnants of the volcano’s original terrain. They then used a <b>simple</b> mathematical equation to, in essence, stretch the remnant surfaces together into a roughly conical shape — what Kauai’s topography <b>likely</b> resembled when the island first formed. Ferrier and his colleagues <b>then</b> measured the difference between the modern topography and this reconstructed topography to estimate the amount of rock <b>eroded</b> over time — and divided this difference by the age of the uppermost volcanic flows to calculate an erosion rate. The researchers performed this exercise for more than 13,000 locations along 32 rivers throughout the island, measuring the erosion rates along each river.<br> They then plotted these<br><img src="http://filmmakermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/happy-sad-face.jpg"><br> <b>erosion</b> rates against precipitation rates across the island and found that, after correcting for each river’s steepness and the size of its drainage basin, rivers that received more rainfall eroded the land faster than those with<br><img src="http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_ltnq8zFOsb1r5siw7o1_400.jpg"><br> less rain.<br> Feeding the flowThe researchers compared their measured erosion rates to a mathematical equation widely used to predict a river’s erosion rate.<br> This equation attributes the erosion rate to the river’s steepness and the rate of flow through its channel, but the flow rate is typically assumed to depend only on the <b>size</b> of <a href = "http://zed15.tumblr.com/trademiner">trademiner review </a> drainage basin, ignoring spatial <b>differences</b> in rainfall. Other factors that might influence erosion rate, but which are not explicitly included in this equation, include the type of rock being eroded and the <b>kinds</b> of vegetation in the area. Ferrier used <b>measured</b> precipitation rates to calculate the flow rate at every point along each river, and found a strong correlation between the equation’s predicted erosion rates and the measured erosion rates<br><img src="http://cdn.motinetwork.net/motifake.com/image/demotivational-poster/0809/hilarious-hilarious-air-guitar-idiot-retard-cat-demotivational-poster-1220603476.jpg"><br> — a result that indicates how much precipitation really matters when it comes to predicting how <b>a</b> landscape will erode. Sean Willet, <b>a</b> professor of geology at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, says the group’s greatest <b>strength</b> was in its <b>choice</b><br><img src="http://stalinsmoustache.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/fart02.jpg"><br> of experimental <b>setting.</b> “In earth sciences, we cannot simulate many of these things in the laboratory; we have to go out in the field <b>and</b> find naturally occurring experiments,” Willet says.<br> “The study they did in Kauai did this beautifully.<br> <b>They</b> found <b>a</b> place on the Earth where we knew much about what the original landscape looked like, we had a fantastic change in the climate where the rainfall went from half a meter to 9 meters over a few kilometers, and they used that as a naturally occurring experiment in order to quantify these processes.<br> And to me, that’s really what made this a valuable contribution.”“This is exciting because it shows<br><img src="http://images2.layoutsparks.com/1/58179/sad-woman-moon-night.jpg"><br> that some bold ideas that have been proposed about landscapes are probably right,” Perron says. “For example, <b>if</b> it rains more on<br><img src="http://cdn.motinetwork.net/demotivationalposters.net/image/demotivational-poster/0806/wtf-wtf-demotivational-poster-1214703933.jpg"><br> one side of a<br><img src="http://dezignus.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/15lovely-heart-vector1.jpg"><br> mountain range, it might actually make the mountain <b>range</b> asymmetric and change its width. <b>Just</b> by changing atmospheric processes, you can change how the solid Earth is deforming. Now there is some empirical support for <b>these</b> ideas.”<br><br><img src="http://filmmakermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/happy-sad-face.jpg"><br> A romance that began with cymbals — well, one, anyway.<br> Quarks, bosons, muons, electrons, neutrinos: This is the stuff the universe is made of, <a href = "http://zed15.tumblr.com/tinnitusmiracle">tinnitusmiracle review </a> particles <b>fascinate</b> MIT senior Christie Chiu.A physics and math major from Bedford, Mass., Chiu excelled in <b>math</b> and science from an early age and dreamed of <b>attending</b> MIT, <b>her</b> father’s alma mater. She and her best friend throughout grade school “would tell all our teachers — any adults, literally anyone who would listen — that when we grew up, we were going to become engineers, go to MIT, and be roommates,” Chiu recounts.In<br> middle school and high <b>school,</b> Chiu’s interest in MIT grew when she attended Splash, an annual, <b>weekend-long</b> program at the Institute packed with classes taught by MIT students.<br> “I really liked the atmosphere, the energy that was here,” Chiu says.As a freshman at the <b>Institute,</b> she found herself drawn to the physics department. “The professors were just<br><img src="http://images.wisegeek.com/panting-dog.jpg"><br> so engaged in what they were teaching,” Chiu <b>says.</b> “I felt a lot of energy in the classrooms.”Now, Chiu <b>channels</b> that same energy <b>as</b> a teaching assistant for<br><img src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-AZK5Z0QogiE/US5GwmVDJHI/AAAAAAAAFF0/9tjAj__p7fs/s1600/learning%2Bto%2Bfart.jpg"><br> Junior Lab, the notoriously challenging lab class for physics majors. “I absolutely fell in love with it, while other people were maybe not liking it so much,” Chiu says. “That’s one of the reasons I became a TA — so that I could get people more excited about this and make them want to go into experimental physics.”Her<br> efforts as a fervent ambassador for the Department of Physics have also included work as a counselor for PhysPOP,<br><img src="http://stalinsmoustache.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/fart02.jpg"><br> the department’s pre-orientation program for incoming freshmen. “It’s like summer camp for a week,” she says, smiling. “You get to play with all the cool things in the physics department at MIT!”When she’s not <b>busy</b> with <b>physics-related</b> activities, Chiu spends time with her sorority sisters in Kappa Alpha Theta and captains the MIT sport pistol team, which she describes as a surprisingly <b>meditative</b> activity. “There’s a lot of mental focus and composure that’s required <b>to</b> <b>excel</b> in <b>the</b> <a href = "http://zed15.tumblr.com/Shapeshifter-Yoga">Shapeshifter-Yoga </a> says. Neutrinos in <b>the</b> spotlightChiu is currently working with physics professor<br><img src="http://i.i.com.com/cnwk.1d/i/tim/2012/12/10/Dog_drives_1210_480x360.jpg"><br> <b>Janet</b> Conrad on <b>research</b> related to neutrinos: tiny particles, primarily produced in the sun, that constantly shower down upon the Earth.Physicists have learned that these particles continually oscillate, or transform, among three types: electron, muon and tau neutrinos. To better understand this neutrino oscillation, researchers at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, in Illinois, are conducting an experiment called MicroBooNE (Micro-scale Booster Neutrino Experiment).<br> They use accelerators to <b>generate</b> a beam of <b>neutrinos</b> that then pass through very cold liquid argon, exciting some of <b>the</b> argon atoms. When the atoms return to a lower-energy state, they emit photons called “scintillation light” — which can give researchers <b>valuable</b> information about those neutrinos and their oscillations, helping to resolve discrepancies among the results from various neutrino experiments.But that scintillation light has a wavelength of <b>around</b> 128 nanometers — which might as well be invisible. “It’s in the vacuum UV; it can’t even pass through glass,” Chiu says. “So <b>that</b> makes it very <b>difficult</b> for us to detect it.”A chemical called tetraphenyl butadine, or TPB, provides a solution <b>to</b> <b>the</b> <b>problem.<br></b> When the scintillation light hits TPB, it is absorbed and re-emitted as blue light, at a longer wavelength of 425 nanometers — which can easily be detected. The only problem was that TPB seemed to stop working well after a while: For some <b>reason,</b> it degraded over time.<br> Chiu’s lab bench <b>is</b> surrounded by piles of acrylic plates, some clear and some with a milky coating of TPB. “We found that if we just left these laying out, then over time, the amount of light <b>that</b> it would be<br><img src="http://media1.onsugar.com/files/2012/11/47/3/301/3019466/Someecards-COVER.xxxlarge/i/Funny-Thanksgiving-Someecards.jpg"><br> able to wavelength-shift went down,” Chiu explains. “We thought there <b>might</b> be effects from humidity, light or heat.”Chiu’s<br> research during her junior <b>year</b> finally identified the <b>culprit:</b> It was <b>indeed</b> light — specifically, the ultraviolet rays <a href = "http://zed15.tumblr.com/Fibroids-Miracle">Fibroids Miracle </a> streaming in through the large <b>windows</b> along one wall of <b>the</b> lab <b>and</b> from the overhead lights. Both are now covered with shielding <b>material,</b> allowing the TPB — and the researchers — to work uninhibited.Last<br> summer, Chiu presented the <b>results</b> of her TPB study at Fermilab alongside graduate students and postdocs from all over the country — and received first-place <b>recognition</b> for her research and poster.New<br> challengesNow that Chiu has finished her work with TPB, she’s working on computer-generated simulations of neutrinos <b>in</b> liquid argon for MicroBooNE. The scintillation light that researchers detect is actually <b>produced</b> through two different microscopic processes, she explains.<br> “Knowing the breakdown of how the light is produced between these two processes actually helps us identify the particle,” Chiu says. <b>“We</b> want to <b>simulate</b> the processes to verify that we fully understand <b>the</b> system.”After<br> graduating this spring, Chiu plans to pursue a PhD in particle physics and hopes <b>to</b> one day combine her love of research and teaching as a professor.“There are still a lot <b>of</b> unanswered questions in particle physics,” Chiu says.<br> “Believe it or not, the particles most people are familiar with — that is, protons, neutrons <b>and</b> electrons — compose very little of all the matter in the universe. <b>There</b> are so <b>many</b> things we don’t understand, like dark matter and dark energy, not to mention much about the elementary particles themselves. <b>To</b> learn more about these things — that’s what these experiments are here for.” Two years ago, the Big East conference dreamed of television riches. That was before its members began defecting. Is it now obligatory for <b>the</b> terminally ill to work until their final breath?&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Rep.<br> Paul Ryan <b>(R-Wis.)<br></b> delivered a wonky speech to the Conservative Political Action Conference on Friday, just a week after releasing the latest version of his House Republican budget. The 2012 GOP vice presidential nominee argued that <a href = "http://zed15.tumblr.com/ex-girlfriend-guru">i want my girlfriend back </a> record debt is a sign that it is doing too<br><img src="http://filmmakermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/happy-sad-face.jpg"><br> much.<br> But he also sought to allay concerns that Republicans will simply cut indiscriminately. Read full article &#62;&#62; The Atlantic Coast Conference has reached an agreement to send a<br><img src="http://cutestuff.co/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/cute-dog-cuddling-a-cat.jpg"><br> team to the Pinstripe Bowl <b>at</b> Yankee Stadium.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> March is my pudgiest month.<br> <b>Winter</b> has made it challenging to get to the gym or outside for regular runs. <b>But</b> now spring is nigh (it officially starts March 20!), <b>and</b> shorts-wearing weather can't be far behind. So now's the time to start getting <b>in</b> shape<br><img src="http://25dip.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/1260894977149-annual-dog-show.jpg"><br> for the warm months ahead. I will<br><img src="http://highermusic.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/carinaround.jpg"><br> if you w... "Wear your clothes," she tells "Nightline." "What are you <b>saving</b> up for? I'm wearing my sequins at 12 noon to lunch, and I'm wearing, you know, five cocktail rings to the supermarket." The gay rights movement in France as experienced by its (now-elderly) footsoldiers is here given a respectful accountThe documentary Les Invisibles gives a face to the unseen and a voice <b>to</b> the inaudible, spinning a sedate, respectful account of the gay rights movement as experienced by its foot soldiers.<br> Sébastien Lifshitz lines up his elderly revolutionaries and intercuts their memories with archive footage <b>from</b> France's dark age, when Paris Match ran inflammatory headlines, placards clamoured for the death penalty and homosexuality was treated as a psychiatric disorder. The film's subjects often emerge as reluctant activists, forced by circumstance to defend their dignity and fight for acceptance. Today, we find them chattering in farmhouse kitchens, at work in their gardens<br><img src="http://i.i.com.com/cnwk.1d/i/tim/2012/12/10/Dog_drives_1210_480x360.jpg"><br> or <b>sailing</b> <b>on</b> the Med.<br> Living well, Lifshitz implies, is <b>the</b> best revenge.Rating:<br> 3/5DocumentaryGay rightsSexualityFranceWorld cinemaXan Brooksguardian.co.uk &copy; 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of <b>this</b> content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds Tubby Smith has joined what was already an impressive roster of men's basketball coaches in the Big
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hostteenhy posted on Nov 2nd 2013 ...

The <b>stars,</b> currently in “Far from Heaven” Off Broadway, will reunite for a musical adaptation of the Robert James Waller <b>novel.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br></b> NBC’s announced <b>it</b> will move “Smash” to Saturday nights to play out <b>the</b> remainder of its second season.The F.B.I. and the C.I.A. separately had Tamerlan Tsarnaev, the suspect who <b>died</b> last week, listed in government databases in 2011, though they cleared him of extremist links.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Comedy Central's <b>Stephen</b> Colbert looks at the court's "so-called judicial reasoning." Read full article &#62;&#62;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Revealing a fractured historyZuber joined the MIT <b>faculty</b> in 1995, and has since devoted much of her career to charting the evolution of planets in the solar system. Through her work, she and others have created detailed surface maps of Mercury, Mars and the moon. Most recently, Zuber has focused on understanding the interior structure of the moon <b>—</b> a body whose evolution may <b>mirror</b> that of Earth and the other planets. It’s widely thought that a hail of comets and asteroids bombarded <b>the</b> solar system early in its history, creating massive craters on <b>the</b> moon <b>and</b><br><img src="http://static.ibnlive.in.com/pix/slideshow/11-2012/the-13-best/main-1-doodle-071112.jpg"><br> surrounding planets. While such craters <b>have</b> largely been erased <b>on</b> Earth by tectonic activity, the moon has remained relatively unchanged — a preserved specimen of the early solar system.<br> Data from GRAIL have so far revealed surprising features beneath the lunar crust.<br> The two spacecraft measured the distance between each other as they circled <b>the</b> moon: Changes in the <b>intervening</b> distance indicated a gravitational pull from the <b>moon,</b> and from<br><img src="http://allwomenstalk.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/8-pretty-bralettes-by-free-people/vintage-floral-cropped-bralette_8-pretty-bralettes-by-free-people.jpg"><br> these measurements, Zuber and her colleagues stitched <b>together</b> a high-resolution map <b>of</b> the moon’s gravitational field. From their map, the <b>researchers</b> found that nearly all of the moon’s gravity is due to surface features, such as mountains and <b>craters.</b> Only 1 <b>percent</b> of the moon’s gravity, they discovered, <b>came</b> from inner <b>structures</b> — an indication that the moon’s interior may be incredibly fractured. In fact, Zuber said the extreme fracturing of the interior may have been caused by a collision with a massive body, possibly the size of <b>Earth.</b> Crashing <a href = "http://zed15.tumblr.com/directory-of-ezines">directory of ezines review </a> for <b>the</b> very small gravitational contribution from beneath the lunar <b>crust,</b> Zuber said this minor signal may come from structures called buried dikes — “massive tension cracks” that could have formed as the moon’s <b>early</b> molten core expanded, stretching the overlying crust and creating deep fissures, or dikes, <b>within</b> it. The lunar map created by GRAIL is the most detailed map of the moon to date, rivaling gravitational maps of Earth. Zuber said<br><img src="http://lh6.ggpht.com/_dlkAw43cLC0/SY_dejQkbHI/AAAAAAAADHY/8OKtsVeIWrA/s800/14-Lovely-Hearts-for-St-Valentines-day-jump.jpg"><br> future lunar missions may use maps created by GRAIL to determine how much energy a vehicle or an astronaut <b>needs</b> to scale certain <b>elevations,</b> such as the lunar highlands or a crater rim.  She added that such high-resolution <b>maps</b> were possible in part because of the probes’ path: Zuber’s team <b>programmed</b> the probes to fly relatively close to the moon’s surface — as close as commercial airplanes fly over the Earth.<br> At such <b>low</b> altitudes, the spacecraft were able<br><img src="http://static.ddmcdn.com/gif/dog-9.jpg"><br> to make very precise measurements, with one drawback: Every week, the team had to make adjustments to keep the probes from crashing. The probes ultimately did crash into the lunar surface <b>on</b> Dec. 17, nearly a year after they entered the moon’s orbit. The programmed crash was a decision Zuber made in the name of good<br><img src="http://speakfresh.com/wp-content/uploads/wtf5.jpg"><br> data. “We wanted to use every last <b>bit</b> of fuel <b>to</b> measure gravity with high precision, which means going very low,” Zuber said.<br> “I still can’t believe NASA let me<br><img src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-wIPUt3ew7YM/T__gRbGW_YI/AAAAAAAAAKY/nccvYud4qGQ/s1600/Fart.jpg"><br> do this.”While the mapping portion of <b>the</b> GRAIL mission has ended, researchers are still poring over the <b>collected</b> data. Zuber said the GRAIL team is currently the largest users of supercomputing computation time at NASA, and she hopes GRAIL’s data will continue to uncover more information about the moon’s early history.<br> “We’re never going to have a <b>set</b> of data <b>like</b> this for other planets,” Zuber said.<br> “The observations made on the moon will help us understand other terrestrial planets.” Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh look gorgeous <b>but</b> it's Flora Robson as Queen Elizabeth who steals the showFire Over England <a href = "http://zed15.tumblr.com/forex-growth-bot">forex growth bot download </a> K <b>HowardEntertainment</b> grade: B+History grade: CIn 1588, the Spanish Armada sailed against Elizabeth I's England.International<br> relationsPhilip II's Spain is beleaguered by English pirates.<br> The Spanish ambassador turns up at the court of Queen Elizabeth (Flora Robson) to protest. Elizabeth insists she has nothing to do with piracy, and considers herself Philip's loving sister (as history buffs will know, he was married to her half-sister, Mary I). "His portrait still hangs in a place of honour," she assures the ambassador.<br> "My king does not ask your grace to hang his portrait, but to hang his enemies," the ambassador zings back.PiracyMeanwhile, fictional English pirate's son Michael Ingolby (Laurence Olivier) is aboard a ship <b>when</b> it is taken by the Inquisition.<br> He jumps overboard and swims to the <b>Spanish</b> coast. Conveniently, he stumbles ashore at the <b>palace</b> of an old friend of his father's. Even more conveniently, the old friend of his father's has a comely daughter, Elena (Tamara Desni).<br> Soon he's having a <b>whale</b> of a time hanging out on a Spanish beach, wearing a silly hat, singing songs and indulging in a <b>light</b> <b>holiday</b> romance.JusticeThe reverie sours when Michael sees <b>smoke</b> rising from nearby Lisbon.<br> (The film's geography is baffling: Lisbon, <b>being</b> slap-bang in the middle of 16th-century Portugal, would not have been visible from anywhere in Spain – though it was the port <b>from</b> which the Spanish <b>Armada</b> sailed.)<br> The Inquisition has condemned his<br><img src="http://redkiteprayer.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Winter_Ride.jpg"><br> father to die by fire.<br> Michael<br><img src="http://img1.funscrape.com/en/sadness/7.jpg"><br> flies into a hammy tantrum. "If <b>only</b> you knew how I loathed you all! Your Spanish faces, your Spanish voices!" he bellows at his hosts. "You've <b>made</b> me your household pet, but you've burned my father!" This scene is perhaps not supposed to be quite as hilarious as it <b>is.CastingMichael<br></b> flees to <b>England</b> on a fishing boat, and swiftly disarms an assassin heading for Elizabeth.<br> "I would give you my life," he tells the queen. "Would you?" she replies, caustically. "Would you give me your silly young life?" She's magnificent.<br> But Michael is distracted by the dewy beauty <a href = "http://zed15.tumblr.com/natural-vitiligo-treatment">natural vitiligo treatment review natural vitiligo treatment </a> lady-in-waiting, Lord Burghley's fictional granddaughter, Cynthia (Vivien Leigh).<br> This <b>was</b> Olivier <b>and</b> Leigh's first film together, and they were both still married to other people at the time – though not for long.<br> They're disarmingly gorgeous on screen: Leigh sparkling and catlike; Olivier a 1930s Henry Cavill, only slightly less inflated and wearing more guyliner.Even so, it's Robson who steals this show. She may not be as stunning as her co-stars, but she's <b>by</b> turns charming, earthy and surprisingly vulnerable,<br><img src="http://lovelypackage.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/lovely-package-alchimia-1.jpg"><br> with a crackling wit. She's perfect as Elizabeth – a role she reprised three years later, in Errol Flynn vehicle The Sea Hawk.SpyingElizabeth sends Michael <b>to</b> spy on Philip II (Raymond Massey).<br> "Make up the fire," the Spanish king orders a flunkey.<br> "This hot <b>April</b> day?" asks the flunkey. Philip replies, in a tone that can only have been inspired by Bela Lugosi's Dracula: "I am. Always.<br> Cold." Politically, you'd expect this film to be one-sided, and it is.<br> There's a fun fictional subplot that allows Michael plenty of <b>scope</b> for sword fights, scampering around rooftops, setting fire to things and so <b>forth,</b> and gives him <b>another</b> go with the now-married Elena. <b>Back</b> in England, Cynthia pines for him unwarrantedly.BattleThe film <b>rejoins</b> history at Tilbury, <b>where</b> Elizabeth is preparing to defeat the Spanish Armada.<br> The navy's real commanders, Francis Drake and Lord Howard, have been written out of the film; <b>instead,</b> it's Michael who sends the fireships. To Elizabeth's annoyance, he wants to <b>celebrate</b> afterwards by marrying Cynthia. This leaves the queen with no one to flirt with, except her <b>troublesome</b> old flame the Earl of Leicester (Leslie Banks).<br> "I'll have no married folk at my <b>court,"</b> she growls.<br> "I'm a married man," Leicester admits, earning the queenly riposte: "More fool you."VerdictThough<br> Fire<br><img src="http://lh6.ggpht.com/_dlkAw43cLC0/SY_dejQkbHI/AAAAAAAADHY/8OKtsVeIWrA/s800/14-Lovely-Hearts-for-St-Valentines-day-jump.jpg"><br> <b>Over</b> England is fictionalised, it's entertaining and <b>has</b> a decent grasp of <b>the</b> <b>historical</b> context.<br> Moreover, its Elizabeth <b>is</b> one of the finest you'll see on screen.Period<br> and historicalDramaFilm criticismLaurence OlivierAlex von Tunzelmannguardian.co.uk &copy; 2013 Guardian News <b>and</b> Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All <a href = "http://zed15.tumblr.com/Pregnancy-Miracle">Pregnancy Miracle </a> | Use of this content is subject <b>to</b> our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds Angela<br><img src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-f3e9taMe7no/UIhzojqUyNI/AAAAAAAAAao/rXTnpZw03oI/s1600/Miniature_Australian_Cattle_Dog_Pacey_IMG_3637.jpg"><br> Adams’s new Landscape collection was inspired by woodlands, harbors, <b>gardens</b> <b>and</b><br><img src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-wIPUt3ew7YM/T__gRbGW_YI/AAAAAAAAAKY/nccvYud4qGQ/s1600/Fart.jpg"><br> dunes.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> Claire Messud discusses her new novel, “The <b>Woman</b> Upstairs.”&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Greg Kalleres, whose <b>play</b> <b>“Honky”</b> opened at Urban Stages on <b>March</b> <b>14,</b> <b>wonders</b> what word best pushes white people’s buttons. MOSCOW <b>—</b> How hard is it to adopt a child? “People either think we’re crazy or we’re heroes,” said Gulnara Panina, a Moscow mother who, with her husband, Pavel Panin, has adopted <b>two</b> children, Denis and <b>Yanna,</b> both 6.<br> <b></b> Read <b>full</b> article &#62;&#62;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; With its appeal of an order to make the most common next-day birth control pill available to <b>all</b> ages with no prescription, the Obama administration is returning to a charged political issue.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Credit: Wikipedia • Boca Juniors 1-1 River PlateThe crowd<br><img src="http://societyandreligion.com/minecraft/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/2012-04-15_133810_1996625_2004770.jpg"><br> disturbances that have so often marred the superclásico encounters between Argentinian<br><img src="http://img1.funscrape.com/en/sadness/7.jpg"><br> heavyweights River Plate and Boca Juniors came to the fore again on Sunday as the derby between the <b>Buenos</b> Aires rivals had <b>to</b> be halted in the second <b>half</b> while riot police intervened to stop violence in the stands at Boca's La Bombonera stadium.The game, which ended 1-1, was stopped for 15 minutes in the second half when fans set off fireworks, tossed flares <b>at</b> players on the field, and climbed a steel fence separating the stands from the pitch.Security forces <b>responded,</b> pounding fans with water cannons in another example of the <b>relentless</b> violence that threatens so many matches in Argentina.<br> <b>No</b> injuries were immediately reported.The result ultimately helped <b>neither</b> club and extended Boca's record winless run to 11 league matches.River<br> Plate's Manuel Lanzini scored with a <b>header</b> after only 45 seconds and Santiago Silva equalised in the 39th minute before a sellout crowd at La Bombonera.The point saw River Plate move to within four points of early-season leaders Lanus, but Boca have only 10 points, leaving them near the bottom of the table and increasing the pressure on their coach, Carlos Bianchi.Boca<br> <b>JuniorsRiver</b> PlateArgentinaguardian.co.uk<br> <a href = "http://zed15.tumblr.com/vision-without-glasses">vision without glasses review </a> Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br><img src="http://lovelypackage.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/lovely-package-alchimia-1.jpg"><br> Five years after ethnic violence swept through Kenya’s Rift Valley, Jeffrey Gettleman returns to see how a new <b>election</b> could affect the still-scarred region.<br> Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly knows the<br><img src="http://fc06.deviantart.net/fs29/i/2008/164/b/f/Sunshine_by_Akaeya_Lovely.jpg"><br> importance of staying on message and he has <b>been</b> consistent all spring.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> Insurance provider WellPoint has agreed to pay a $1.7 million fine for exposing more than 600,000 personal records <b>online</b> due to weak database security, the U.S. Department of Health <b>&amp;</b> Human <b>Services</b> (HHS) said Thursday. WellPoint, based in Indianapolis, is one the largest health insurers in<br><img src="http://bridalmusings.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/lovely-LA-by-Sweet-Little-Photographs_00.jpg"><br> the United States, with more than 100 million<br><img src="http://images.businessweek.com/ss/05/12/bestproducts/image/intro.jpg"><br> customers covered by it and its subsidiaries.<br> Lawmakers embarked Tuesday on an <b>uphill</b> battle to <b>delay</b> a controversial law that would reduce the fees<br><img src="http://images5.fanpop.com/image/photos/25700000/hercule-is-real-wtf-dragon-ball-z-25790590-962-715.jpg"><br> banks receive from merchants each time a debit card is swiped.<br> Toronto Blue Jays starter Ricky Romero smiled and beamed with confidence after yet another sub-par outing Friday. Outspoken Roman Catholic priest and social activist in Sri Lanka who was excommunicated during the papacy <b>of</b> John Paul IITissa Balasuriya, who has died at the age of 89, was an outspoken Roman Catholic priest and social activist in Sri Lanka who became the only liberation theologian to be excommunicated during the papacy of John Paul II. He was punished in 1997 for challenging<br><img src="http://societyandreligion.com/minecraft/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/2012-04-15_133810_1996625_2004770.jpg"><br> official views on the Virgin Mary, the concept of original sin, the need for baptism, the right of women to become priests and the role and value of other world religions. After widespread international publicity, the ban was lifted a year later, but Balasuriya remained a strong critic of Joseph Ratzinger, who in his role as <b>head</b> of the Congregation for the <b>Doctrine</b> of the Faith had been in charge of the Vatican's proceedings against him.Shortly after Ratzinger became Pope Benedict XVI, Balasuriya wrote: "He <b>has</b> to have a less eurocentric view of the world.<br> He must be <a href = "http://zed15.tumblr.com/trademiner">trademiner </a> accept that God can speak <b>to</b> humanity through<br><img src="http://media.ebaumsworld.com/picture/rsxfolife/Wtf.png"><br> other media than <b>the</b> Christian church".Although<br> liberation theology and <b>the</b> view that priests should take an active role in <b>fighting</b> social injustice swept across Latin <b>America</b> and the Philippines to the Vatican's dismay during<br><img src="http://img.thesun.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01667/DOG620_1667986a.jpg"><br> John Paul II's papacy, none of its proponents was treated as severely as Balasuriya.As<br> a Catholic on an island that was largely Buddhist and Hindu, Balasuriya's views might have been ignored by the Vatican.<br> Even among Sri Lanka's Catholics and most of its local hierarchy his ideas, which were expressed most clearly in his book Mary and Human <b>Liberation</b> were considered <b>unconventional.</b> But they appeared to rile the authoritarian Ratzinger (then a cardinal) as a prime example of the "relativism" which the future Pope identified as the Catholic church's most dangerous enemy at the time.<br> He felt they <b>had</b> to be stamped on hard for fear <b>they</b> might spread.Balasuriya's depiction of the mother of Jesus Christ as a strong-willed revolutionary challenged centuries of European iconography <b>in</b> which Mary is portrayed as docile and voiceless. This was something which not even <b>the</b> Latin-American theologians had argued. A dedicated anti-imperialist, Balasuriya was acutely conscious of the <b>leading</b> role that the Catholic church and its missionaries had played in advancing the colonial cause.The<br> <b>Vatican</b> declared the book on Mary<br><img src="http://fc06.deviantart.net/fs29/i/2008/164/b/f/Sunshine_by_Akaeya_Lovely.jpg"><br> to be heretical. Its fierce reaction may also have been prompted by an earlier row with Sri Lankans. Shortly before visiting the country in 1995, Pope John Paul II had described Buddhism as "negative" because of its "indifference" to the world. The country's leading Buddhist monks organised <b>protest</b> demonstrations and refused to meet him.By contrast, Balasuriya stated that in Asia, where Catholics are a minority, it was important for them to be respectful of other religions.<br> "The oriental view of history is more cyclical than linear. In Hinduism and Buddhism this life is only one stage in a vast cycle of birth, death and rebirth. The cycle continues until all reach ultimate liberation in Nirvana. In the Christian view this <a href = "http://zed15.tumblr.com/tinnitusmiracle">tinnitusmiracle review </a> one's ultimate<br><img src="http://images.businessweek.com/ss/05/12/bestproducts/image/intro.jpg"><br> and eternal destiny," he wrote in the offending book.Ratzinger<br> sent Balasuriya a "profession of faith" <b>that</b> was <b>specially</b> written for him, and that he was ordered to <b>sign</b> in repudiation of his views.<br><img src="http://dezignus.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/15lovely-heart-vector1.jpg"><br> Balasuriya refused to recant.Instead,<br><br><img src="http://societyandreligion.com/minecraft/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/2012-04-15_133810_1996625_2004770.jpg"><br> after six days of negotiation in Colombo with <b>senior</b> church officials, he signed a "statement of reconciliation" in which he merely regretted that other people had perceived doctrinal errors in his writings and thereby taken offence.<br><img src="http://prettylittleliars.alloyentertainment.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/4/files/2010/08/ashleybenson.jpg"><br> He also said he had expected "a more open dialogue for an objective scrutiny of my book".<br> The excommunication was lifted in January 1998.Balasuriya was born in Kahatagasdigiliya, in the northern part of the island to a middle-class family from Negombo, on its west coast. His father, a travelling pharmacist on the government payroll, sent him to a prestigious Catholic school. After graduating from the University of Ceylon in economics, he spent <b>six</b> years in Rome studying philosophy and theology before being ordained in 1953.<br> He briefly did postgraduate studies in agricultural economics at Oxford University before returning to Sri Lanka, <b>where</b> he became a teacher and later rector of Aquinas University College in Colombo.A member of the country's dominant Sinhalese majority, Balasuriya was radicalised by the youth rebellion in 1971, when Sinhalese students <b>and</b> unemployed new graduates mounted a violent uprising against the government. Known as the <b>JVP</b> (Janatha Vimukhti Peramuna or People's Liberation <b>Front),</b> and demanding land reform and jobs, they captured rural<br><img src="http://img.thesun.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01667/DOG620_1667986a.jpg"><br> police stations and came close to taking control of several regions in the south <b>of</b> the island. The uprising was put down with ruthless brutality. Some 8,000 insurgents and their sympathisers died.Shocked<br> by the sharpness of the issues that could <b>lead</b> to such bloodshed, Leo Nanayakkara, one of Balasuriya's mentors, resigned as bishop of Kandy, and Balasuriya himself abandoned his post at Aquinas University College. He <b>started</b> working <b>in</b> slum areas of Colombo and <b>revived</b> a journal called Social Justice, turning it <b>into</b> a campaigning showcase for human rights <b>promotion</b> and economic reform. He founded the Centre for <a href = "http://zed15.tumblr.com/Shapeshifter-Yoga">Shapeshifter Yoga download </a> Religion to <b>organise</b> inter-ethnic dialogue and encounters with Hindus, Buddhists and Muslims.<br> He helped to found the Ecumenical Association of Third World Theologians.Balasuriya did not advocate violence, but argued that if Jesus had been born in Sri Lanka he would probably have been one of the young revolutionaries who disappeared or were killed.<br> Mary, his mother, reminded Balasuriya of hundreds of tough Sri Lankan mothers and sisters searching for <b>news</b> of missing loved ones and holding <b>desperate</b> families <b>together.Citing</b> the words of the Magnificat that Mary is <b>said</b> to have uttered after being told she was to give birth to Jesus Christ, ("He hath put down the mighty from their seats and exalted <b>them</b> of low degree..."),<br> Balasuriya argued that Mary was a "strong, mature, working-class woman" <b>who</b> helped to<br><img src="http://images2.fanpop.com/image/photos/14400000/Pretty-Little-Liars-Cast-Instyle-Makeover-Shoot-hanna-marin-14429238-500-632.jpg"><br> bring <b>up</b> her son <b>as</b> a revolutionary <b>and</b> shared his thinking. While many of his <b>disciples</b> fled, or denied or betrayed Jesus, Mary<br><img src="http://hartfordmag-survey.wehaaserver.com/imgs/media.images/25/best-of-hartford-square.jpg"><br> remained faithful.<br> Because of her loyalty and activism, Balasuriya called her "the first priest of the new testament", who <b>had</b> been "dehydrated" for generations by the church's male power-holders.<br> In an interview with me in his book-cluttered office in the monastery compound of the Oblates of <b>Mary</b> Immaculate, the order to which <b>he</b> belonged for decades, Balasuriya said the <b>church</b> hierarchy had reduced Mary "from being the disturber of the comfortable to the comforter of the <b>disturbed".</b> His image of a strong Mary was a better <b>role-model</b> for women, he thought, than the pale virgin of a thousand Renaissance <b>paintings.Balasuriya</b> was an impish figure who always loved verbal sword-thrusts.<br> But he had just been excommunicated when I saw him, and he clearly felt upset, as well <b>as</b> angry at his undemocratic treatment.<br> Supported by progressive Catholics in Europe and the <b>US</b> as well as Asia, he was demanding a chance to <b>have</b> an audience at the Vatican, where he could face his accusers and argue his doctrinal differences rather <b>than</b> just be <b>ordered</b> to recant.A few <b>weeks</b> later both sides reached a compromise, though lower-ranking <a href = "http://zed15.tumblr.com/Fibroids-Miracle">Fibroids Miracle </a> sent to Colombo to <b>meet</b> him to discuss his case.<br> Ratzinger stayed aloof. Instead of the special statement sent <b>to</b> him by the Vatican which included a sentence saying the church did not have the authority to ordain women, Balasuriya professed his faith according to<br><img src="http://dezignus.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/15lovely-heart-vector1.jpg"><br> the Credo of the People of <b>God,</b> a general statement used throughout the church. Explaining his part of the compromise, he said his "reconciliation" did not accept that the church could never ordain women.Free<br> <b>to</b> celebrate mass again, Balasuriya spent his last years publishing essays on <b>the</b> injustice of the capitalist system and working <b>with</b> poor communities around Colombo. His frailty did not permit him to go to Tamil areas in the north of the island or take an active part in supporting human <b>rights</b> during the civil war that ended in 2009.Until<br> his death, he continued to argue that the Vatican should be more willing to acknowledge the crimes of Europeans during the colonial period as well as the Crusades, the inquisition and the burning of witches.In<br> a 2006 essay after Pope Benedict's <b>visit</b> to<br><img src="http://prettylittleliars.alloyentertainment.com/files/2012/10/emily-fields-pll-character.jpg"><br> Auschwitz, where he prayed "Why do you sleep, O Lord?", Balasuriya recalled how a young Sinhala militant had addressed a statue of the seated Buddha during the 1971 uprising with the worlds: "Rise up, you have been seated long enough for 2,500 years.""While<br> the Pope is deeply moved by the <b>massacres</b> in Europe, it is necessary that a further cry goes up to God to ask why such a long period of inhuman cruelty could have been tolerated by the Christian churches," he wrote.•<br> Tissa Balasuriya, theologian and activist, born 29 August 1924; died 17 January 2013Sri LankaCatholicismPope Benedict XVIPope John Paul IIReligionReligionChristianityBuddhismHuman rightsJonathan Steeleguardian.co.uk<br> &copy; 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds British actor will produce and take leading role in adaptation of Suzanne Rindell's jazz-age novelKeira Knightley will star in <b>and</b> take a producer's <a href = "http://zed15.tumblr.com/ex-girlfriend-guru">i want my girlfriend back </a> the jazz-age period piece The Other Typist, according to the Hollywood Reporter.Based on Suzanne Rindell's 1920s-set debut novel, published in the UK <b>this</b> month, the film will centre on a lonely young typist living in a downtrodden police precinct on New York's Lower East Side who befriends an exotic, stylish new <b>arrival</b> at her workplace. Together, Rose and Odalie explore the Big Apple's seedy yet glorious underworld.The Guardian's John O'Connell has compared Rindell's book with other famous examples of the "unreliable narrator", such as Patricia Highsmith's The Talented Mr Ripley and Zoë Heller's Notes on <b>a</b> Scandal, both of <b>which</b> have been made into films. The novel has also drawn comparisons with the work of Alfred Hitchcock, and – perhaps inevitably, given the high-profile debut of Baz Luhrmann's starry big-screen version – F Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby.The Hollywood Reporter does not make clear whether Knightley is <b>to</b> play the prudish <b>Rose</b> or the enigmatic and charismatic Odalie. The Other Typist has been picked up by 20th Century Fox offshoot Fox Searchlight, which produced another recent tale of two young women with<br><img src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-4QXGgJw4dP0/UFs3-_PRvRI/AAAAAAAAB9Q/-FFfVMH3Z9Q/s1600/imagedogs.jpg"><br> diametrically opposed personalities, the Oscar-winning<br><img src="http://dansbestmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/gotta-fart-bigtime1.jpg"><br> Black Swan. The new film does not yet have a director attached.Keira KnightleyFilm adaptations20th Century FoxDramaAlfred HitchcockBaz LuhrmannF Scott FitzgeraldBen Childguardian.co.uk<br> &copy; 2013 Guardian News and <b>Media</b> Limited or its affiliated companies.<br> All rights reserved.<br> | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions<br><img src="http://lh6.ggpht.com/_dlkAw43cLC0/SY_dejQkbHI/AAAAAAAADHY/8OKtsVeIWrA/s800/14-Lovely-Hearts-for-St-Valentines-day-jump.jpg"><br> | More Feeds<br><img src="http://hartfordmag-survey.wehaaserver.com/imgs/media.images/25/best-of-hartford-square.jpg"><br> President <b>Obama</b> announced Friday that National Security Adviser James L. Jones will leave his post by the end of the month and be replaced by his most senior deputy, Thomas E.<br> Donilon, <b>in</b> a transition that will ensure continuity as the war in Afghanistan enters a decisive phase.<br> Spain, the World Cup winner, routed Tahiti on Thursday in the Confederations Cup in Rio de Janeiro.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; A O. Scott and David Carr delve into reading, the tried-and-true way and the technologically savvy way.<br> The Syrian Observatory for <b>Human</b> Rights, an opposition group based in Britain, said <b>civilians</b> accounted for the biggest single category of
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cplbear posted on Sep 24th 2013 ...

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