10,JJ How do u play them

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52366 Nibs: 2,407
Member Since: Jun 2nd 2006
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Posted on Jul 13th 2006
one thing you can take into consideration: if you get this hand in the early stages of a cheap tournament and you're in late position, push them all in. there are usually a lot of goofballs in there who will call your hand with next to nothing ("omg ive got A4 offsuit, ill go all in too!") the few times you will be called by a much better hand are just the price you'll have to pay to get the headstart in the most tourney's where this happens... think about it!
_________________________________ Fortune favors the bold!
6056 Nibs: 161,327
Member Since: Sep 11th 2005
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Posted on Jul 13th 2006

There is no point in risking your chips early in a tourney. Why risk all your chips early on unless you've got the nuts or a very solid hand. This is one mistake most players make...the blinds are so low and you have so many chips you've got so much time to build there is not point in taking huge risks early on.

"Tip of the day" "Your first instincts are better than 95 percent correct if you're a poker player. That's because your first instinct comes from all the training and practice and skills that you've learned over the years."
20491 Nibs: 975
Member Since: Feb 12th 2006
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Posted on Jul 14th 2006
Really aggressive
JuTeJi is the shit
23344 Nibs: 5,174
Member Since: Feb 20th 2006
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Posted on Jul 14th 2006
i agree.....Depending on the raises before you or not....Say there are no raises then you must play aggressively pre flopp and continue after the flop. If someone is calling or re raising then you have to back off especially iwth higher cards on the table.
19805 Nibs: 1,002
Member Since: Feb 9th 2006
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Posted on Jul 21st 2006
I am aggressive
I am me
58850 Nibs: 1,071
Member Since: Jun 24th 2006
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Posted on Jul 21st 2006  -  Subject: It depends..
Both JJ and TT are great hands and I love them, way moreso than the medium pairs 66-99. But the way I play them are completely different. If I'm playing at a cash game and there have been a lot of limpers, and I'm in late position, it's a raise almost every single time. If it's a rather loose game where someone raises in early position, and then several calls behind that, then I will take a gamble and just call also, trying to hit a set. If it's a tight game or if I'm in early position, I will almost always raise it up. It's rare that I limp in early position with these hands unless I'm pretty sure an aggressive player will raise behind me so I can reraise and isolate. If I'm playing at a tournament setting, it depends on the stage of the tournament. If it's early on, just play them like any high pocket pair, raise/reraise to isolate, with the occasional limp/call to try and hit a set, esp against loose aggressive player. Towards the end of the tournament, these are the hands you're looking for (well, besides AA, KK, QQ) to just shove in your chips. Just keep in mind that you're going to be racing a lot with these hands unless you're playing with super donks (you're heavily favored) or super tight players (you will be up against overpair). By the way, keep in mind these hands are not AA and KK. Don't get married to them preflop. If there's significant action, like raise, then reraise; you would need a very good reason to stay in the hand (ie. you all have huge stacks, the raiser AND reraiser are somewhat loose, you know how to lay down an overpair, etc.). If someone limp-reraises you, be careful, because most people only do that w/ the big pairs. Finally, on the flop, check out the board. If it comes w/ overcards, esp an A, be very careful! I tend to fire out a continuation bet if I had the lead preflop, whether an overcard falls or not, but if you meet resistance, be prepared to dump the hand (again, doubly true if there's an A on the board). If there is more than 1 overcard on the board, it's probably better to just check it down unless you know the players to be weak-tight. If someone else had the lead preflop and an overcard falls, and they fire out a bet, you would need a VERY VERY good reason to stay in (ie. you know them to be an aggressive player who fires out CBs most of the time), be sure to dump the hand if there are callers or raisers as almost 90%+ you'll be beat. If the board comes w/ all undercards, I would lead out or raise any bets. These situations are tricky as your opponents may have an overpair to yours (not too likely) or a set, or even 2 pairs. That's why when you raise, you gain a bit more information. If you get reraised, you're almost always beat, unless you're up against a loose-aggressive player. Don't get committed to draw-heavy boards. These boards will almost always give SOMEONE a draw, and you will have a hard time chasing them out on the flop. What I like to do in these situations is play weakly on the flop, see a free/cheap turn card, and if it's a blank and it looks my hand might still be good, then take some action. Otherwise, check/fold all the way. Now, during that once in a blue moon moment when you flop your set. Ooh boy.. rejoice! For the poker gods are smiling upon you. There's nothing better than being in a pot with TT/JJ and see your set, ESPECIALLY if you see an overcard, preferably an A out there also. These are your opportunities to wreck havoc on your opponent's stack. Just remember to see what type of player they are, and play back accordingly. Against tight/passive players, you may want to let them catch up a bit, since they won't call any bets otherwise. Against loose players, go ballistic!! Bet/raise and make them pay!! Against aggressive players, it's probably better to slowplay until the turn/river, unless there's some obviously dangerous draw out. I hope that helps you all gain an insight into how to play these hands. To a certain extent, 88-99 can be played this way as well. But, of course, the chances of meeting an overcard or overpair are greatly increased, 88-99 are reduced more to trying to hit sets. Good luck at the tables! (I've hit probably 4-5 big hands this past month w/ JJ and flopping a set)
11178 Nibs: 1,581
Member Since: Dec 3rd 2005
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Posted on Jul 22nd 2006  -  Subject: JJ
In my career, I have learned that you must play these hands very strong, but you have to also know when to get ride of them. If you raise to 50 in a 5/10NL game and the most consevative player at the table put all or his chips in (lets say 275) you have to get rid or them. Its not worth being a 4 to 1 dog. THats poker, coderedpoker
Codered
60588 Nibs: 118
Member Since: Jul 15th 2006
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Posted on Jul 22nd 2006
never bet :)check ! or raise :P
29373 Nibs: 11
Member Since: Mar 17th 2006
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Posted on Jul 22nd 2006
If I have alot of chips I will raise preflop, if I don't have to much chips I will call, of course the flop is very important and also then number of peoples at table.
8985 Nibs: 356
Member Since: Oct 31st 2005
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Posted on Jul 22nd 2006
I would just flat call for any PP less than QQ. And hope for a good flop even trips. Often you get out drawn by an ace rag hand. But with an all in with QQ or higher you can isolate and have a better chance of doubling up. gl
"Life is Life and Poker is just a game"
74710 Nibs: 2,705
Member Since: Jan 27th 2007
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Posted on May 22nd 2007
I would raise a couple of bb's and would have a look what happens on the flop..
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68632 Nibs: 1,262
Member Since: Nov 4th 2006
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Posted on May 22nd 2007
depends on what position and how many in the hand but raise usuallly.
76200 Nibs: 394
Member Since: Feb 26th 2007
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Posted on May 22nd 2007
see what other players are doing. all limpers, raise it big 4-5x. if you are playing a sng, and depending on the # of players left at your table, and your chip stack, i think those are all in hands. I agree but I hate QQ. It is unluck pair for me.
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